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Tuesday, 5 November, 2002, 13:49 GMT
Bali bomb 'suspects' arrested
Grab of television footage of the suspect arrested in Medan on Monday
One of the men was arrested for using fake papers
Indonesian police say they have arrested two men who resemble those suspected of involvement in the Bali bombings.

Indonesian police chief Da'i Bachtiar said that one of the men was arrested in Medan in north Sumatra on Monday, while the other was detained in Jakarta, the Indonesian capital, on Tuesday.

He told Indonesia's parliament that they both resembled police sketches of men seen by several witnesses at the scene of the blasts.

Police spokesman Colonel Prasetyo said the man detained in Medan - a 28-year-old identified only as Zulfan - was arrested for using fake identity papers.

He was trying to board a flight to Malaysia from Medan when he was arrested.

A police sketch of one of the suspects

The Indonesian police have already announced that they know the names and probable whereabouts of all three men suspected of a role in the 12 October bomb blasts, which killed nearly 200 people.

Police sketches of the men, who were seen in the area of last month's attack, were released last week.

Teams of investigators have been sent to the hideout of the men police think they have identified.

'Larger group'

The suspects are all reportedly Indonesian. They are said to range in age from 20 to 30.

Police have said they believe the suspects were part of a group of six to 10 people involved in the bombing.

Forensic evidence suggests the bombs were triggered by electronic devices or remote control, rather than being the work of suicide bombers.

Experts investigating the blast say the bombing was sophisticated and carefully planned.

About 120 detectives and intelligence officers from Australia, the United States, Britain, Japan and other countries are working on the case alongside Indonesian investigators.

The regional Islamic militant group Jemaah Islamiah is suspected by some governments of being behind the bombing.

Abu Bakar Ba'asyir, the group's spiritual leader, is being questioned by police over a series of church bombings in December 2000, and in an alleged plot to assassinate Megawati Sukarnoputri before she became president.

Mr Ba'asyir, who is in a police hospital after suffering respiratory problems and heart and stomach complications, has refused to answer anything but the most basic questions.

His lawyers have filed a wrongful arrest lawsuit against police.

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The BBC's David Bottomley reports from Jakarta
"It's too early to say...whether this is a signficant breakthrough"

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01 Nov 02 | Asia-Pacific
29 Oct 02 | Asia-Pacific
28 Oct 02 | Asia-Pacific
30 Oct 02 | Asia-Pacific
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