BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Chinese Vietnamese Burmese Thai Indonesian
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Asia-Pacific  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Saturday, 26 October, 2002, 11:49 GMT 12:49 UK
Indonesia urged to tackle militants
Australian Prime Minister John Howard at the Apec summit in Mexico
Howard wants Apec nations to crackdown on militants

Australian Prime Minister John Howard has called on Indonesia to do more to curb militant groups thought to be linked to the bombing on the island of Bali that killed almost 200 people.


I put very strongly to President Megawati the need for the strongest possible measures to be taken against terrorism

Australian PM John Howard
Mr Howard was speaking on the eve of a summit of the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation (Apec) in Mexico after his first face-to-face meeting with Indonesian President Megawati Sukarnoputri since the 12 October bomb attack.

"No amount of international exhortations can substitute for the determination of individual governments, who know they have a terrorist problem within their borders," he said.

The annual Apec summit of the region's 21 nations usually focuses on trade, but this year is expected to be dominated by the international war on terror.

Calls for crackdown

Mr Howard expressed his thanks to the Indonesian President for the help his country had received since the car bomb attack outside a Bali nightclub.

Investigators at scene of attack
Most of the victims of the Bali attack were Australians
Many of those killed in the attack were Australian citizens.

Mr Howard went on to outline the need for a tough stance on militant groups in Indonesia, such as Jemaah Islamiyah, which is thought to have links to al-Qaeda.

"I put very strongly to President Megawati the need for the strongest possible measures to be taken against terrorism in Indonesia," he said.

Mr Howard said Indonesia should take whatever action was necessary to deal with people who committed criminal offences.

Tight security

His statement came just hours before Apec heads of state were due to meet for their annual summit in the Mexican resort of Cabo San Lucas.

Security is tight, with 3,000 police and troops fanned out across the main conference site. Mexican warships are patrolling the waters of this coastal resort.

Key issues at the summit will be the financing of extremist groups through money-laundering.

The Apec leaders are expected to issue a statement on counter-terrorism, focusing on denying would-be attackers access to ships and planes.

The initiative aims to strengthen customs and immigrations enforcement.

The Apec forum was set-up in 1989 to foster free trade in the across the region.

This is the 10th time Apec heads of state have met.

Unofficially, it is also a major political event with room for bilateral meetings.

This year includes meetings between the heads of states of the United States, Japan and South Korea to discuss a common strategy to the revelation that North Korea has been developing nuclear weapons.


Key stories

Eyewitness

Background

TALKING POINT

AUDIO VIDEO
See also:

17 Oct 02 | Asia-Pacific
21 Oct 02 | Asia-Pacific
07 Sep 02 | Asia-Pacific
16 Oct 02 | UK
15 Oct 02 | Asia-Pacific
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes