BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Chinese Vietnamese Burmese Thai Indonesian
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Asia-Pacific  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Sunday, 13 October, 2002, 13:28 GMT 14:28 UK
'It was a horrible sight'
Victims evacuate the bar
The Kuta area is popular with westerners
British tourist Matt Noyce, who was in a bar in Bali's Kuta beach when there was a massive explosion, tells the BBC what happened.

It happened about midnight. I was sitting in Paddy's bar talking to a couple of guys I'd met about 10 minutes earlier.

Basically there was just a massive explosion. You didn't really realise it was an explosion to start with.

You just saw a blinding light and your ears felt like they were exploding.


Outside it was awful, like something you'd see out of Vietnam. There were bodies everywhere

There was just complete panic in the bar, loads of people diving for the door trying to scramble over each other.

Then outside it was awful, like something you'd see out of Vietnam. There were bodies everywhere.

It was pretty dark but you could tell some people were really badly injured. Lots of blood everywhere, people with burns.

Some people with limbs that just, well, just terrible, terrible injuries.

Street chaos

It was awful, the streets were really clogged with people, those people who had made it out of the bar and people who were wounded. It was quite a while before any kind of help came.

Fires started to spring up after the explosion and I saw one fire engine arrive quite a bit later.

People who were walking were trying to help those people who were on the road or unconscious or couldn't move or get them onto the pavement.

The whole place was in chaos because it was a really busy Saturday night. So it was a horrible sight.

In the end, a few of us were trying to take the worst wounded and get them away from the scene because some of the fires were getting pretty hot.

These people were pretty badly injured, you wouldn't really want to move them normally but there was no other help.

I was afraid there were going to be more explosions and more fires springing up because we didn't know whether it was a bomb or a gas cylinder.

Around that strip of bars at night there are lots of Westerners, from the UK, America, all over.

Little help

But there were lots of local people as well who I saw were injured.

It would have been one of the most popular bars in the Kuta area.

If it was a bomb they must have hit it purposely at just the right time.

Some people said they thought it was a gas cylinder.


You couldn't really see you couldn't tell who was the worst injured, it was just chaos, it was horrible

But one person I was talking to who was a fireman, an American or a Canadian, said he could smell TNT in the air. He said he was sure it was an explosion.

I don't know if that is true.

When I left there weren't any bodies left in the road near where the explosion was.

Everybody had moved the worst people away because there were still fires going.

There was very little in the way of emergency services.

Confused

I saw one fire engine and maybe one ambulance.

At one stage somebody had a taxi or a truck and people were loading bodies into the truck, it was that bad.

You couldn't really see - you couldn't tell who was the worst injured, it was just chaos, it was horrible.

I went back a few hours ago to see what was going on and there were lots of local people clearing up and there were still a few fires going.

People are very, very shocked.

I was on my own in the bar but I saw people who were looking for their friends or people they were travelling with.

They had no idea where they were.

One woman came up to me and said: "Can you tell me what country I'm in, what town I'm in?"

She had no idea so I was trying to say: "You are in Bali, you're in Kuta, there's been an accident."

There were a lot of very, very confused people, people in shock.

I don't know what the figures are for injured or dead but I'm sure it must be pretty bad.

The British Consulate in Bali has set up a 24-hour telephone number for people anxious about relatives or friends in the tourist resort. It is 00 62 361 270 601.


Key stories

Eyewitness

Background

TALKING POINT

AUDIO VIDEO
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes