BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Chinese Vietnamese Burmese Thai Indonesian
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Asia-Pacific  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Wednesday, 2 October, 2002, 10:08 GMT 11:08 UK
Smoking ban on Tokyo's streets
Japanese businessman smoking a cigarette
Smokers in parts of the capital could soon face fines
Smokers in Tokyo will soon face fines if they light up in certain busy streets.

Nicotine addicts have a month to kick the habit before risking a 20,000 yen ($164) penalty.

The restrictions are coming into force near crowded stations and other busy areas in the heart of Tokyo's government and business district.

Young Japanese women aged 20 in traditional kimono dresses have a smoke after their coming of age ceremony
A quarter of high school students smoke
The central Tokyo ward of Chiyoda said residents had complained that smokers were holding their cigarettes close to children's face level.

Uniformed patrols are already on the streets to remind people of the new rules, which come into force from 1 November.

As soon as the patrol spots someone smoking they offer them a portable ash tray.

One in four Japanese smoke. Smoking is popular among high school students, who can easily get hold of cigarettes despite a law banning children from buying them.

Non-smokers fed up with getting smoke blown in their faces and by people littering the streets with cigarette butts may welcome the new ban.

But people on the streets of Tokyo on Tuesday were sceptical that the new restrictions would put people off.

"Smokers will smoke no matter where they are," one man, Hiroyoshi Ohtaki, told Reuters news agency. "They will only stop if it causes health problems, not because the area is a no-smoking zone."

Chiyoda, home to Japan's Parliament building and the Imperial Palace, is the first local government in Japan to regulate smoking in this way.

See also:

28 May 02 | Asia-Pacific
13 Mar 02 | Asia-Pacific
16 Aug 01 | Health
16 Mar 00 | Crossing Continents
19 Nov 98 | Health
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes