BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Chinese Vietnamese Burmese Thai Indonesian
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Asia-Pacific  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Monday, 10 June, 2002, 10:19 GMT 11:19 UK
More chemicals found at Uzbek base
Officers from the 101st Airborne Division
Troops at the base support colleagues in Afghanistan
US soldiers have found more traces of possible chemical weapons at a former Soviet base now being used by the Americans.

Deadly nerve agents and mustard gas were identified earlier in three areas of the Karshi Khanabad station in Uzbekistan.


We still have no reported cases of chemical agent exposure

Military spokesman Colonel Roger King

The latest discovery could be a blood agent such as cyanide, which stops cells in the blood absorbing oxygen.

All troops have been moved away from the affected areas though a military spokesman said there was no confirmation the newest find did indicate the presence of more chemical weapons.

Colonel Roger King said further tests were needed on the traces, which could actually be rocket fuel as that has a similar composition to some types of blood agents and has caused confusion in past tests.

About 1,000 American military personnel are stationed at the air base which they call K2 and which is being used as the logistics centre for the operation in Afghanistan.

Colonel King said: "Medical surveillance of all personnel at K2 continues and we still have no reported cases of chemical agent exposure."

Sensors deployed

A routine inspection of the base had turned up three areas of contamination.

Officials said the traces may have come from chemical weapons believed to have been stored at Karshi Khanabad when it was a Soviet base.

Though a test last year detected no dangers, warm weather may have caused the release of new vapours, according to one theory.

It was also possible that chemical weapons were buried under the site and were now leaking, a military official said.

Tests are continuing and sensors have been placed around the base to monitor any spread of dangerous gases.

See also:

01 May 02 | Asia-Pacific
13 Oct 01 | Asia-Pacific
02 Oct 01 | Asia-Pacific
25 Apr 02 | Country profiles
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes