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Sunday, 15 April, 2001, 05:47 GMT 06:47 UK
Greens contemplate US oil boycott
Chimneys
A stated goal was the fight against global warming
Green party delegates from more than 60 countries, who are in Australia for their first ever international conference, are discussing a possible boycott of United States oil companies.

Australian Green leader Bob Brown, a senator in his country's national Parliament, told the BBC in an interview that there was support for such a boycott unless President Bush reversed his decision to reject the Kyoto agreement on measures to tackle global warning - a move he said was influenced by the oil companies.


A global force at the start of this century that is going to challenge the old parties and the economic rationalist philosophy

Senator Bob Brown
Mr Brown said the conference was aiming to challenge the growing international influence of major corporations.

International environmental group Greenpeace is said to be leading the initiative.

It has given US oil companies 10 days to detach themselves from the Bush decision, according to European Greens secretary general Arnold Cassola.

Mr Bush announced last month that he was not prepared to ratify the Kyoto treaty because it could have a negative effect on the US economy.

Need for power

Mr Brown said the goal of the green movement was to be more than a mere lobby group, to fight against global warming and for stronger democracy in mainstream politics.

George W Bush
Bush: Told to reverse his decision to reject Kyoto
"Experience over the last 30 years has shown that being a protest party is not enough, if you want to attain change, you need some power," he said.

The aim was to ensure that the corporations were not at an unfair advantage politically because of their considerable financial influence.

Green parties already exist in more than 80 countries, and have seats in 29 national parliaments.

They are participants in coalition governments in Germany, France, Italy, Belgium, Finland, Slovenia and Mexico.

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See also:

13 Apr 01 | UK Politics
Blair urged to tackle Bush over Kyoto
09 Apr 01 | Music
Sting slates Bush over Kyoto
25 Nov 00 | Sci/Tech
Analysis: What next?
28 Mar 01 | Sci/Tech
US blow to Kyoto hopes
30 Mar 01 | Americas
Kyoto: Why did the US pull out?
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