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Thursday, 15 March, 2001, 15:52 GMT
Australian man begs to be cloned
Cloning graphic
A childless 84-year-old Australian man is begging to be cloned so he can have a family.


I'm very serious about this. I'm very lively, very fit and active

Frank Hansford-Miller
Frank Hansford-Miller, who describes himself as "medically castrated" from prostrate cancer, told an Australian newspaper: "I think it's very unfair that women are being helped with reproductive technology and men are getting nothing."

His appeal comes as Italian and US doctors press ahead with their controversial proposals to clone human beings.

Mr Hansford-Miller argued that he would be able to support children, saying he had a good income and his family had good longevity.

Failed attempts

"I'm very serious about this. I'm very lively, very fit and active," the Sydney Morning Herald reported him saying.


I'm still active and run marathons, but I feel a failure because I have no children to leave behind

Frank Hansford-Miller
He has already appealed unsuccessfully to health authorities around the world as well as Australian Prime Minister John Howard.

The mathematician, who migrated to Australia from the United Kingdom in 1980, has now turned to the public, in the hope that public sympathy will help sway his case.

The Perth resident said he had believed he was unable to father a child after failed attempts to have children with his late wife.

Then, when she died seven years ago, he learnt from a family friend that the problem had stemmed from his wife's blocked fallopian tubes.

"I'm still active and run marathons, but I feel a failure because I have no children to leave behind," he said.

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Carbon copy?
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See also:

10 Mar 01 | Sci/Tech
Human cloning plans under fire
09 Mar 01 | Sci/Tech
Doctor ready to clone babies
09 Mar 01 | Sci/Tech
Doctors defiant on cloning
09 Mar 01 | Sci/Tech
Human cloning: The 'terrible odds'
29 Aug 00 | Europe
Pope condemns human cloning
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