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Friday, 22 September, 2000, 21:54 GMT 22:54 UK
US report admits racism
Black protestors in New York after Diallo's death
Blacks were outraged over the killing of Amadou Diallo
A report prepared by the US State Department says there are "significant obstacles" that are preventing the United States from eliminating racism.

"Over the years, the United States has worked hard to overcome a legacy of racism and racial discrimination, and it has done so with substantial successes," the report says.


The residual effects of slavery and institutionalised racism can still be seen

Harold Koh, State Department
"Nevertheless, significant obstacles remain."

The US Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights, Harold Koh, said disparities still remained in American society.

"The residual effects of slavery and institutionalised racism can still be seen in lingering disparities between blacks and whites in income, levels of education and health care, and rates of incarceration in our nation's prisons," Mr Koh said.

Police brutalities

The report made references to police brutality involving:

  • The beating of black motorist Rodney King by two Los Angeles police officers
  • The death of Guinean immigrant Amadou Diallo in New York when police mistook him for a suspected criminal, last year.

It said the Department of Justice also indulged in racial profiling and conducted spot traffic checks on black taxi drivers.

The report however noted some that there was a rapidly-increasing number of African-American professionals, business leaders and elected political officials.

The report said recent surveys showed a complete difference in opinion between blacks and whites about racism; most whites believed there was less discrimination today than previously, but blacks disagreed.

The State Department prepared the report on US compliance with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination for the United Nations.

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31 Aug 00 | Americas
US Secret Service sued for racism
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