Languages
Page last updated at 18:28 GMT, Friday, 14 May 2010 19:28 UK

Thousands of undelivered letters hoarded by US postman

Taped-off postman's house in Philadelphia (14 May 2010)
Delaying mail and stealing mail are both federal offences in the US

Some 20,000 pieces of mail - many more than a decade old - have been recovered from a postman's garage in the US city of Philadelphia.

Tubs of undelivered letters were discovered in April when the US Postal Service worker missed several days of work and managers visited his home.

The FBI said it took more than three postal vans to remove the mail, some of which dated back to 1997.

Investigators are still trying to find the postman so they can question him.

Delaying mail and stealing mail are both federal offences in the US.

The missing mail is said to have included large numbers of cheques, bills and official letters. Many have since been delivered to bewildered residents of Bustleton, a north-eastern suburb of Philadelphia.

"I got mail today from 2007," Kevin Carpenter told ABC News. "Pay-cheques, things like that that I needed - stuff from the social security administration and the IRS."

"I asked Dave [the postman] and Dave said he hadn't seen it but as soon as he got it he'd call me," Mr Carpenter added.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
'Overworked' postman hoarded mail
09 Sep 08 |  Europe
Postman hoarded 21,000 letters
07 Aug 04 |  Asia-Pacific
Postman charged with letter theft
17 Jul 04 |  Staffordshire



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2018 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific