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The BBC's Nick Bryant
"A politician with all the charisma of a chartered accountant"
 real 56k

The BBC's Philippa Thomas in Philadelphia
"What he lacks in charisma he makes up in confidence"
 real 56k

Thursday, 3 August, 2000, 03:59 GMT 04:59 UK
Cheney goes on the attack
Dick Cheney
Mr Cheney and his wife Lynne greet delegates
The Republican nominee for the US vice-presidency, Dick Cheney, has promised big changes in Washington if voters send George W Bush to the White House in November.

Mr Cheney, 59, was speaking at his party's convention in Philadelphia, as he accepted his formal nomination as Mr Bush's running mate.


When I look at the administration now in Washington, I am dismayed by opportunities squandered

Dick Cheney
Mr Bush will formally accept the presidential nomination on Thursday, as the climax of a convention that has seen the party attempt to shake off its widely-perceived conservative image.

In his speech to delegates, Mr Cheney accused the Clinton-Gore administration of squandering the opportunities of the past eight years.

'Partisan strife'

Some 2,000 delegates erupted in cheers and waved Bush-Cheney placards.

To a chorus of "Go Dick, Go", he said Mr Bush would restore decency and integrity to the Oval office.


In Washington today, politics has become war by other means, an endless onslaught of accusation

Dick Cheney
He said the Democrats had turned Washington into a place of bitter partisan strife and it was time for change.

"We are all a little weary of the Clinton-Gore routine," he said. "But the wheel has turned. And it is time. It is time for them to go."

Up to this point in the Republicans' campaign, Mr Gore and Mr Clinton have been largely ignored. Their mention by name delighted the delegates, who erupted into applause.

George W Bush
George W Bush will make his acceptance speech on Thursday
"It's time for them to go," yelled back the delegates.

Mr Cheney lauded Mr Bush in words that implicitly criticised President Bill Clinton.

"He is a man without pretence and without cynicism. A man of principle, a man of honour.

"On the first hour of the first day he will restore decency and integrity to the Oval Office," Mr Cheney said.

Historic speech

Mr Cheney made history by becoming the first Republican vice-presidential candidate to be offered his own night at the convention to deliver his acceptance speech.

Mr Cheney's speech came against a background of attacks from the Democrat strategists, who have been using his conservative voting record in the 1980s to portray him as an extremist.

National advertisements are already being aired to hammer home the message to the electorate.

Correspondents say the aim of these attacks is to undermine the "compassionate conservatism" at the centre of the Bush campaign.

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See also:

02 Aug 00 | Americas
Gerald Ford recovering after strokes
25 Jul 00 | Americas
Dick Cheney: A safe pair of hands
02 Aug 00 | Americas
Bush backs missile defence system
29 Jul 00 | Election news
Choreographing the convention
01 Aug 00 | Election news
The two faces of Philadelphia
01 Aug 00 | Election news
Bush's bumpy centre ground
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