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Anger in Pakistan over doctor's US conviction

By Mark Dummett
BBC News, Islamabad

Courtroom sketch of the trial of Aafia Siddiqui - 3 February 2010

There has been an angry reaction in Pakistan to the conviction in a US court of a Pakistani doctor for the attempted killing of US agents.

Aafia Siddiqui tried to carry out the shootings while in detention in Afghanistan in 2008.

Pakistan's media has closely followed every twist and turn of her case.

Most people here firmly believe that she is innocent, that she is the victim of torture and that she has been unfairly treated by the US courts.

The foreign ministry spokesman said that the government was dismayed by the guilty verdict and would be in touch with her lawyers and family to see what it could do to help.

Dr Siddiqui's family has spoken with anger about her conviction.

A sister said that the guilty verdict demonstrates that America cannot provide justice to innocent people.

And her mother said that the verdict was in fact a humiliation for the US.

The case seems to have confirmed many Pakistanis' belief that innocent Muslims have been wrongly caught up in America's counterterrorism operations.



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