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Fort Hood suspect 'is paralysed'

Nidal Malik Hasan in 2007 (Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)
Maj Nidal Malik Hasan's paralysis could be permanent, his lawyer says

The US Army psychiatrist accused of murdering 13 people at Fort Hood is paralysed, his lawyer says.

Maj Nidal Malik Hasan, 39, was shot by police during the incident at the Texas military base on 5 November.

Lawyer John Galligan told reporters his client had no feeling in his legs and doctors had told him the condition may be permanent.

Maj Hasan could face the death penalty after being charged with 13 counts of premeditated murder.

New information

On Thursday, the military revised the number of people injured in the attack, revealing that a total of 43 people were wounded.

HASAN TRIAL PROCESS
Trial by court martial
Jury comprising military personnel
Verdict decided by secret ballot - two-thirds majority needed
Unanimous vote required for death penalty

Of those, 34 people received gunshot wounds, military investigators said.

It had been reported previously that 29 people and Maj Hasan had been injured, but more had come to light during the course of the investigation.

Police shot Maj Hasan four times, ending the gunman's rampage through the base after an hour and a half. It was reported at first that he had been killed.

'Extreme pain'

This was the first time Mr Galligan had been able to speak to his client, who is still in hospital in San Antonio.

"He understands who I am. We can talk," he said.

Sgt Kimberly Munley
Police Sgt Kimberly Munley had been praised for shooting the gunman

"But I was only there for an hour and towards the end of the one-hour session, I could tell I was kind of pushing him in terms of my ability to keep him fresh and alert in a discussion with me."

Mr Galligan added that Maj Hasan was suffering "extreme pain" in his hands.

Meanwhile, doubts have emerged over who exactly fired the shots that brought down Maj Hasan.

Earlier this week Police Sgt Kimberly Munley, 34, appeared on the Oprah Winfrey show from her hospital bed where she was recovering from being wounded by Maj Hasan.

She said she had fired at the gunman.

But now Sgt Mark Todd says he was the one who "neutralised" Maj Hasan.

"I drew his attention toward me, and then he opened fire and then I neutralised him and secured him," Sgt Todd told CBS's Early Show.

They were the first shots Sgt Todd had fired at a human being in his 25-year career, he said.

'In the dark'

Mr Galligan said he was not pleased that his client had been charged by military authorities while he was in hospital, without his lawyers present.

"What I find disturbing is that my client is in ICU [Intensive Care Unit], and he's 150 miles south of his defence counsel, and he's being served with the charges," Mr Galligan told the Associated Press news agency.

"I'm in the dark and that shouldn't be the case. I am mad."

The civilian lawyer, appointed by Maj Hasan's family, told reporters he did not yet know if the military prosecutors would seek the death penalty in Maj Hasan's case.

He will ask the military court to appoint an additional military lawyer and a civilian investigator to work with him, he said.

The military have not ruled out filing further charges against Maj Hasan, prosecutors said.

A soldier killed in the attack was pregnant and charges could be brought over the unborn baby's death, it was reported on Friday.



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