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Page last updated at 12:54 GMT, Tuesday, 20 October 2009 13:54 UK

Nicaragua court backs re-election

Daniel Ortega - file photo from 2006
Daniel Ortega: Elected first in 1984 and then in 2006

The Nicaraguan Supreme Court has lifted a constitutional ban on re-election, clearing the way for President Daniel Ortega to run again in 2011 elections.

The court's decision followed an appeal by Mr Ortega and a group of mayors.

In July, Mr Ortega said publically he favoured allowing people the right to seek consecutive terms.

The issue of presidential term limits is controversial across Latin America, where several nations have moved to allow consecutive terms in office.

The argument in favour is that, in the modern world, continuity over more than four years is needed if effective policies for change are to be enacted.

But ending term limits is a divisive subject in a region which saw long-running military dictatorships hold sway for much of the 20th Century.

Monday's ruling by the constitutional branch of the Nicaraguan Supreme Court was in response to a petition by Mr Ortega and a group of more than 100 mayors.

Six justices, all regarded as supporters of Mr Ortega's Sandinista party, determined that the constitutional ban on allowing re-election was "unenforceable".

The electoral court indicated it would accept the ruling.

Opposition politicians and jurists condemned the Supreme Court's decision as illegal.

Popular vote

Amid celebrations to mark the 30th anniversary of the Sandinista revolution in July, Mr Ortega said that the country should end term limits, as "all should have the right to stand for re-election and be rewarded or punished by the popular vote".

At the time, it was thought constitutional change would have to be approved by the National Assembly, where Mr Ortega does not have a majority, or be backed in a public referendum.

Mr Ortega first came to power in 1979 after his Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) ousted the dictator Anastasio Somoza. He was elected president in 1984 and served until 1990.

Mr Ortega returned to the presidency after winning the 2006 elections.

A clause from the 1995 constitution bars presidents from running consecutively or serving more than two terms.



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SEE ALSO
Nicaragua's revolutionary legacy
19 Jul 09 |  Americas
Nicaragua poll results disputed
12 Nov 08 |  Americas
Nicaragua's Ortega takes office
11 Jan 07 |  Americas
Sandinistas remember their revolt
19 Jul 04 |  Americas
Country profile: Nicaragua
20 Aug 12 |  Country profiles
Nicaragua timeline
09 Sep 12 |  Country profiles

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