BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: World: Americas
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-------------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-------------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 
Friday, 23 June, 2000, 02:13 GMT 03:13 UK
Hillary escapes 'Travelgate' charges
President and Mrs Clinton
The first US president's wife is seeking political office
By New York correspondent Jane Hughes

The independent prosecutor investigating the Clinton White House says he has found substantial evidence that Hillary Clinton was involved in several controversial sackings in the White House travel office in 1993.

However, Robert Ray says he doesn't plan to bring charges against the first lady because he can't prove that she deliberately lied about her role.

Mrs Clinton has always denied any involvement in the firings.

The announcement comes while she is busy campaigning to become a senator for New York in the elections in six months' time.

Dogged by controversy

Hillary Clinton has declined to comment on the independent prosecutor's finding of substantial evidence that she played a part in what has become known as "Travelgate".

Robert Ray
Ray: Substantial evidence against Hillary
Robert Ray's comments are, however, certain to be seized upon by Mrs Clinton's opponents.

Seven people lost their jobs in the office that handles travel arrangements for presidential trips in 1993.

And the sackings provoked one of several big controversies which have dogged President Clinton and the First Lady.

Robert Ray accused the White House of putting up substantial resistence to his investigators.

But he said he wouldn't be bringing charges against the First Lady because he couldn't prove conclusively that she lied about the affair.

Whitewater

This announcement is part of the gradual winding-up of the long-running Whitewater investigation, which has overshadowed the Clinton presidency.

Monica Lewinsky
The Lewinsky affair marked the height of the Clinton scandals
It's been going on for seven years already, at a cost of $50m so far, and it reached its height in 1998 with the impeachment of the president over the Monica Lewinsky affair.

But there's still potential trouble ahead.

A couple of months ago, Robert Ray said he was actively considering bringing criminal charges against President Clinton when he ends his term in office next January.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

17 Mar 00 | Americas
Filegate: Case closed
25 May 00 | AudioVideo
First Lady 'on the defensive'
17 Jan 00 | Vote USA 2000
Hillary bites the Big Apple
08 Apr 00 | Americas
Hillary edges ahead in polls
21 May 00 | Broadband
Unknown steps up to tackle Hillary
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Americas stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Americas stories