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Page last updated at 22:36 GMT, Thursday, 26 March 2009

US aircraft parts fall on Brazil

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Debris from plane's engine which landed in a Brazil town

Sections of a US plane have fallen from the sky onto a residential area in the city of Manaus in northern Brazil.

Pieces from one of the turbines of the DC-10 aircraft caused damage to several houses and a car, but there were no reported injuries.

The flight, operated by the Miami-based Arrow Cargo company, had been en route to the Colombian capital, Bogota.

Brazilian officials are investigating the incident and the company said it would pay for any damage to property.

Local resident Aparecida Silva said a large part of the turbine had landed on her house when she was sleeping.

Soldier in front of a house damaged by falling aircraft parts in Manaus, Brazil (26/03/2009)
Residents reported hearing a loud bang before the parts fell from the sky

"I opened the window after I head this huge boom and I see this thing up in flames, right in front of my doorway," she told Brazil's Globo TV.

"I had no idea what it was, I thought it was some weird, ugly thing or a UFO or something."

The television station broadcast amateur footage of what appeared to be burning debris falling through the night sky.

Other footage showed damage to houses, one with a collapsed roof and smashed toilet, and a piece of engine about 2m (6ft) long lying in the street.

A representative for Arrow Cargo in Manuas, Rai Marinho, told reporters the plane, carrying three crew members and an engineer, had had engine problems shortly after takeoff.

It was able to continue its journey but was later diverted to Medellin in Colombia because of bad weather, the Associated Press quoted the Colombian air force as saying.



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