Languages
Page last updated at 13:31 GMT, Saturday, 21 March 2009

US bikini wax ban plans ditched

Sunbather
The bikini wax has become a popular procedure in many parts of the world

The US state of New Jersey has scrapped plans to ban bikini waxes after an outcry from beauty salon owners.

The Cosmetology and Hairstyling Board proposed the move after two women were hospitalised for infections following the procedure; one filed a lawsuit.

But officials reversed course after salon owners complained about losing business ahead of the swimsuit season.

Waxing is popular in America, especially as sunbathers head for the beach in the summer.

David Szuchman, New Jersey's consumer affairs director, said in a letter to the board on Friday that he would not support the ban.

Just stay out of our pants, will you?
Linda Orsuto
Spa owner

"Many commenters have noted that the procedure can be safely performed. I, therefore, believe that there are alternate means to address any public health issues identified by the board," Mr Szuchman wrote.

Salons in the New Jersey area reportedly offer the procedure for up to $60 (40).

Spa owner Linda Orsuto told the Associated Press news agency: "It was an unnecessary issue.

"In New Jersey especially, where the government has been picking our pockets for so long, it was like: 'Just stay out of our pants, will you?'"

Bikini waxing is a term used to describe the removal of hair visible on parts of the body beyond a typical two-piece swimsuit.

The procedure can be painful because it focuses on sensitive areas of the body, sometimes resulting in skin irritation or rashes, dermatologists say.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Letting your hair down
12 Jan 07 |  Magazine
Hair today... and tomorrow
16 Jan 07 |  Magazine

RELATED BBC LINKS

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific