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Dutch Iraqi pleads guilty in US

File photo of US troops near Fallujah, April 2004
Wesam al-Delaema was accused of targeting US troops in Iraq

An Iraqi-born Dutch suspect accused of planting roadside bombs in Iraq has pleaded guilty at his US trial.

Wesam al-Delaema, who was extradited from the Netherlands two years ago, is the first suspected Iraq insurgent to be tried in the US.

He agreed to a 25-year prison sentence on charges of conspiracy to murder Americans outside the US, the Associated Press news agency reported.

Born in Falluja, he returned to Iraq after the US-led invasion.

He was among a group that videotaped themselves planting remote-controlled explosives by a road used by US troops. The explosives did not cause any deaths.

Mr Delaema was arrested in May 2005 in the Dutch city of Amersfoort following a tip-off from US authorities.

In Dutch court hearings, he argued that he was kidnapped and forced to make the video on pain of death.

To secure his extradition, the US gave assurances that he would be tried in a federal court, not by a military commission, and could serve any sentence in the Netherlands.

A Dutch judge could decide to reduce his sentence once he returns, the AP reported.

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