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Page last updated at 09:45 GMT, Tuesday, 14 October 2008 10:45 UK

Colombian police find stolen Goya

Reporduction of the engraving by Goya
Sad Premonitions belongs to Goya's later and darker period

A valuable engraving by the Spanish master Francisco de Goya has been found a month after it was stolen from an exhibition, Colombian police say.

The work, entitled Sad Premonitions, was found in a Bogota hotel room after a tip-off, investigators said.

The engraving is part of Goya's "Disaster of War" series which he created between 1810 and 1820.

It was on loan from Spain and reportedly insured for 80,000 euros($108,000; 64,000).

It was stolen on 11 September from a gallery in Bogota.

The exhibition's organisers said the work would go back on display in the Colombian capital, along with dozens of other Goya prints.

Goya (1746 -1828) is regarded as one of the most important and influential of all Spanish artists.

His "Disasters of War" is a series of some 80 etchings that depict scenes from the Peninsular War between France and Spain.

The works are widely regarded as some of the most powerful images in the history of art to portray the atrocity and idiocy of warfare.

The prints were published some 35 years after Goya's death.

The stolen work, Sad Premonitions of What Must Happen (Tristes presentimientos de lo que ha de acontecer) to give it its full title, depicts a man kneeling, gazing to the sky with an anguished expression.




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