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Page last updated at 09:33 GMT, Thursday, 29 May 2008 10:33 UK

Driver killed in US train crash

Derailed train in Chicago, 28 May 2008
The derailment on Chicago's elevated system caused only minor injuries

A train driver was killed and several passengers injured when two commuter trains collided and derailed during rush hour in the US city of Boston.

The incident came only hours after an elevated train derailed in Chicago, leaving several people hurt.

Investigators are still looking into the cause of the Boston crash. The 24-year-old driver died when one train slammed into the back of another.

Passengers described scenes of chaos as small fires broke out at the scene.

Speaking late on Wednesday, a spokesman for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority said emergency workers were trying to free the body of Terrese Edmonds from the wreckage.

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Aerial shots of the site of the crash in Boston

The packed two-car train she was driving was in collision with the second train outside Woodland Station, a suburban stop on Boston's "T" system.

In Chicago, officials said the derailment on the city's elevated railway was down to driver error.

The incident left passengers perched more than 20ft (6m) above the ground. Several were taken to hospital but none had life-threatening injuries.


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