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Monday, 8 May, 2000, 23:12 GMT 00:12 UK
US 'Railroad Killer' pleads insanity
Don Clark
FBI agent Don Clark during the search for Resendiz
A Mexican drifter has admitted responsibility for murdering nine people in the USA.

Lawyers for Angel Maturino Resendiz made the admission as he went on trial in Texas charged with raping and murdering a female doctor in Texas.

Formal pleas of not guilty by reason of insanity were entered on behalf of Resendiz.

His lawyer, Allen Turner, told the court: "The defendant has no remorse for any of his crimes. The defendant in his mind thinks these people were evil and deserved to die."

Resendiz surrendered to the Texas authorities last July, shortly after being placed in the top 10 of the FBI's "Most Wanted" list.


Resendiz
Resendiz pleads not guilty by reason of insanity
Prosecutors, who are seeking the death penalty, say he carried out the nine killings in Texas, Illinois and Kentucky.

All his victims were found near railway lines, earning him the nickname "Railroad Killer".

The court was told that Resendiz had criss-crossed the US and Mexico by train for years.

At one point, he was detained by the US immigration authorities, but was deported to Mexico without questioning because of a computer error.



The defendant has no remorse for any of his crimes. The defendant in his mind thinks these people were evil and deserved to die

Defence lawyer Allen Turner
The trial judge, Bill Harmon, rejected a defence request to move the trial to another city because of the publicity the case had received.

The woman who was raped and murdered, Dr Claudia Benton, was attacked while her husband and children were away. She had been working on research into a rare genetic disorder known as Angelman syndrome.

If Resindez is found guilty of her murder, prosecutors are expected to bring the other killings into play in a bid to press home their request for the death penalty.

"I don't want to overwhelm the jury with all these capital murders, but I still want to prove them beyond a reasonable doubt," prosecutor Devon Anderson said before the trial.

Six of the victims were killed in Texas, two in Illinois and one in Kentucky. The killings took place between 1997 and 1999.

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