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Last Updated: Tuesday, 11 March 2008, 12:32 GMT
Little sympathy for NY governor
New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer attends a news conference
US media appear united in saying that Eliot Spitzer will have to resign
Eliot Spitzer, the New York State governor hit by allegations that he used a prostitution service, can draw little comfort from US newspapers and blogs.

There was near-universal agreement that after Monday's apology, the married father-of-three would be forced to resign.

And much of the media seemed to relish the predicament Mr Spitzer has found himself in.

KENNETH LOVETT IN THE NEW YORK POST

The revelation that Spitzer enjoyed the services of a high-end Washington call-girl ring may bring with it federal charges - and likely means the end of an exceptionally maladroit administration. A good first step to cleaning up Albany now is for Eliot Spitzer to leave. His reputation for integrity is destroyed. It's hard to see how he can remain as governor - or why he should.

BEN SMITH ON POLITICO

He rubbed politicians the wrong way, in particular, with his insistence that every fight be a matter of personal principle - a bruising style that takes on bitter irony given his current predicament.

TOM BEVAN ON REAL CLEAR POLITICS

Spitzer was a hard charging, holier than thou prosecutor who was in many respects a world class jerk. He made tons of enemies in his short tenure in office, and he preferred bullying and bluster to nuance and negotiation. The story of Spitzer's (apparent) demise is a mixture of hypocrisy, hubris, schadenfreude and, of course, personal shame and family tragedy.

MICHAEL POWELL AND MIKE MCINTYRE IN THE NEW YORK TIMES

He stands close to ruin's precipice, this tireless crusader and once-charmed politician reduced to a notation on a federal affidavit: Client 9. Mr. Spitzer cast himself, self-consciously, as the alpha male, with a belief in the clarifying power of confrontation. So often the governor seemed to accumulate enemies for sport, to threaten rivals with destruction when an artful compromise and a disingenuous slap on the back might do just as well.

EDITORIAL IN THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

One might call it Shakespearian if there were a shred of nobleness in the story of Eliot Spitzer's fall. There is none. Governor Spitzer, who made his career by specializing in not just the prosecution, but the ruin, of other men, is himself almost certainly ruined. The stupendously deluded belief that the sitting Governor of New York could purchase the services of prostitutes was merely the last act of a man unable to admit either the existence of, or need for, limits.

WALTER SHAPIRO ON SALON.COM

Spitzer had the dream and the reputation, and he was on the cusp of getting the votes to finally move New York state politics out of the Erie Canal era. But now it all lies shattered, whatever short-term decision Spitzer makes. Reform politicians who hold themselves up as moral exemplars run the risk of not living up to their own self-proclaimed ethical standards. The financial transaction that was supposedly conducted in Room 871 of the Mayflower Hotel seems so tawdry in light of the glowing portrayal of Spitzer as "Wall Street's Top Cop" on the 2002 cover of Time magazine. The feeling of tragedy is unavoidable as the intense and wired Spitzer has gone from lion to laughingstock in just 14 short months as governor.

NATHAN THORNBURGH IN TIME

If these accusations do spell the end of Spitzer as an individual in political life, his ideas - of reform and clean governance in Albany - had already stalled because of a different cardinal sin: not Luxuria (Lust), as in Monday's scandal, but Superbia (Pride). Spitzer's Superbia had rankled old and new in Albany, certainly the Republican majority in the statehouse, but also many Democrats who were astounded at his prickly partisanship and how it cut off all lines of communication between the executive mansion and the state assembly.



SEE ALSO
Scandal-hit NY governor 'sorry'
10 Mar 08 |  Americas
Profile: Eliot Spitzer
10 Mar 08 |  Americas

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