[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Languages
Last Updated: Wednesday, 8 November 2006, 18:36 GMT
US mid-terms: Winners and losers
The battles of the US mid-term elections have produced high-profile winners and losers in both Republican and Democratic camps.

SENATE

MONTANA: JON TESTER BEATS CONRAD BURNS

Democrat Jon Tester captured a key seat in the party's attempt to gain control of the Senate, hours after the Democrats took control of the House of Representatives.

The Democrats won the Montana Senate seat after a delayed neck-and-neck vote count was completed. This leaves them one seat short of a majority.

The results were delayed after election officials in Yellowstone, Montana's largest county, decided to start counting all the votes again because of difficulties with the new equipment.

It appears that the Democrats' campaign to paint incumbent Conrad Burns as a symbol of what they called a Republican "culture of corruption" has had some success.

Mr Burns had been tainted by links with convicted lobbyist Jack Abramoff, who in January pleaded guilty to charges of corrupting public officials.

The Republican senator had accepted $150,000 (78,000) in donations from Abramoff.

OHIO: SHERROD BROWN BEATS MIKE DEWINE

Mike DeWine

Mike DeWine's Senate seat in Ohio was the first big casualty of the day for the Republicans.

His defeat by Democrat Sherrod Brown came as little surprise, however, in a state where the Republican Party had become mired in scandal.

The Democrats were able to take full advantage of the fall from grace of Republican Congressman Bob Ney, who had represented the 18th district before he recently pleaded guilty to corruption charges.

The state has also been badly hit by economic problems and the deaths of reserve soldiers in Iraq, US media reports suggest.

PENNSYLVANIA: BOB CASEY BEATS RICK SANTORUM

In the defeat of Pennsylvania's Rick Santorum, the Republicans have lost their third-ranking figure in the Senate and a close Bush ally.

The conservative senator's proximity to Mr Bush may have contributed to his downfall, making him vulnerable to Democratic attacks on the leadership.

According to exit polls, about half of those who voted for Democrat Bob Casey said they did so out of dislike for Senator Santorum rather than support for Mr Casey.

The Democrat also benefited from the anger felt by voters towards President Bush and the Republican leadership in Congress, the polls suggested.

Conceding his seat, Mr Santorum said: "The people in this state are so resilient... They are also pretty damn tough and opinionated.

"Sometimes a good thing, sometimes not always that good a thing, like tonight... We are walking away with nothing but thanks."

MISSOURI: CLAIRE MCCASKILL BEATS JIM TALENT

After one of the most closely-fought battles of all, Republican Senator Jim Talent was finally forced to concede his Missouri seat to challenger Claire McCaskill.

The campaign focused on Ms McCaskill's support for a stem-cell research referendum and Senator Talent's opposition to it. The outcome of the ballot initiative was too close to call straight away.

Ms McCaskill benefited when actor Michael J Fox, who has Parkinson's Disease and backs stem cell research, appeared on television to endorse her candidacy.

"It was not for lack of effort, the headwind was just very, very strong this year," Senator Talent said in a speech to disappointed supporters.

TENNESSEE: BOB CORKER BEATS HAROLD FORD JR

Democrat Harold Ford Jr failure to win Tennessee's open seat over rival Bob Corker will be one of his party's biggest disappointments.

Mr Ford, a popular Memphis congressman, had hoped to become the first African-American to win a Southern Senate seat since the aftermath of the Civil War.

During campaigning, he drew excited crowds and big-name Democratic support, with former President Bill Clinton and Senator Barack Obama appearing with him.

But polls showed his support gradually dropping off in favour of Mr Corker, a millionaire who lent some of his own money to his campaign in the closing days.

The Tennessee battle attracted controversy after an advert run by the Republican National Committee was accused of playing on racist undertones.

NEW YORK: HILLARY CLINTON BEATS JOHN SPENCER

Hillary Clinton

Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton won a convincing re-election to her New York Senate seat, taking more than two-thirds of the vote.

Her victory is bound to add to speculation over whether she will seek the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination.

Giving an acceptance speech in Manhattan, with husband and former President Bill Clinton by her side, she stressed her desire to get back to work as a senator.

"The message couldn't be clearer: that it is time for a new course," she told supporters.

"We believe in our country and we're going to take it back, starting tonight."

CONNECTICUT: JOE LIEBERMAN BEATS NED LAMONT

Former Democratic heavyweight Joe Lieberman - candidate for vice-president in Al Gore's failed bid for the presidency in 2000 - beat an official party candidate to reclaim his Connecticut seat in the Senate as an independent.

Mr Lieberman, who lost the party primary earlier this year as a result of his support for the Iraq war and perceived closeness to President Bush, was backed by the Republicans, who urged their supporters to give him their votes.

Mr Lieberman will be one of two independents in the new Senate who have said they will align themselves with Democrats.

VERMONT: BERNIE SANDERS BEATS RICHARD TARRANT

Bernie Sanders, who served eight terms in the House of Representatives as an independent, won the Vermont seat of retiring Senator Jim Jeffords, also an independent, beating businessman Richard Tarrant.

He describes himself as a "democratic socialist", who, like Joe Lieberman, says he will align himself with the Democrats. He is said to be the first self-proclaimed socialist to serve in the Senate.

"The people of Vermont have told America they are sick and tired of right-wing extremism!" he said in his victory speech.

"This election tonight may be the end of a campaign, but it is the beginning of a grassroots movement across America!"

He vowed to fight on behalf of working families, immigrants and against the Iraq war.

RHODE ISLAND: SHELDON WHITEHOUSE BEATS LINCOLN CHAFEE

The Senate seat in Rhode Island went to former state Attorney General and Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse after a closely-fought battle with incumbent Republican Lincoln Chafee.

Mr Chafee was the only Republican to vote against the war in Iraq. He was considered one of the most liberal Republicans in the Senate and his family had held the seat for three decades.

"We gave our best, best effort. But the tide was against us, and our opponent's coffers were overflowing, and the rage against our president proved insurmountable," he told supporters as he conceded the race.

FLORIDA: BILL NELSON BEATS KATHERINE HARRIS

Republican and House member Katherine Harris was heavily defeated by incumbent Democratic Senator Bill Nelson in Florida.

Ms Harris came to national attention in 2000 when, as Florida secretary of state, she certified Mr Bush as winning the bitterly contested state of Florida in his presidential race with Al Gore.


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

FLORIDA: TIM MAHONEY BEATS JOE NEGRON

Democrat Tim Mahoney won in Republican Mark Foley's old district in the aftermath of the scandal that hit the congressman and forced him to resign ahead of the poll - his name was still on the ballot.

Mr Foley quit in disgrace over salacious e-mails sent to congressional pages - young male staff on work experience. He has said he is gay, but denies any sexual contact with pages.

Republican Joe Negron, who would have got the seat if Mr Foley had received the most votes, conceded.

MINNESOTA: KEITH ELLISON BEATS ALAN FINE

Keith Ellison
Keith Ellison, a Democrat, has become the first Muslim to be elected to the US Congress by winning a Minnesota seat in the House of Representatives against Republican rival Alan Fine.

He overcame personal attacks emphasising his past association with Louis Farrakhan, leader of the radical Nation of Islam group.

The 43-year-old lawyer sought to downplay his religion and ran on a populist platform.

He has called for the immediate withdrawal of US troops from Iraq.

"Tonight, we made history," he said in his victory speech. "We won a key election, but we did much more than that.

"We showed that a candidate can run a 100% positive campaign and prevail, even against tough opposition."

ILLINOIS: PETER ROSKAM BEATS TAMMY DUCKWORTH

Iraq war veteran Tammy Duckworth failed in her attempt to win an Illinois House seat for the Democrats despite a high-profile campaign.

The former helicopter pilot, who lost both legs after being shot down in Iraq in 2004, lost to Peter Roskam in a Republican stronghold.

She campaigned on a platform of strong opposition to the Iraq war, and called for an immediate reduction of US troops.


GOVERNORS

CALIFORNIA: ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER BEATS PHIL ANGELIDES

Arnold Schwarzenegger has won a second and final term as California governor for the Republicans, although he adopted a moderate stance on issues such global warming.

The former Hollywood action movie star easily defeated a challenge to his governorship from Democrat Phil Angelides.

"What a fantastic evening; I love doing sequels," he told supporters in Beverly Hills. "But this without any doubt is my favourite sequel."

He spent much of the campaign focusing on getting support for multi-billion-dollar bonds designed to fund infrastructure including roads, housing and schools.

MASSACHUSETTS: DEVAL PATRICK BEATS KERRY HEALEY

Deval Patrick
Former civil rights prosecutor Democrat Deval Patrick became the first black governor of Massachusetts, and only the second elected black governor of any state.

He also ended a 20-year Republican hold on the governor's office by beating Kerry Healey.






FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific