[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Languages
Last Updated: Tuesday, 31 October 2006, 04:55 GMT
Violence returns to Mexican city
Police cordon in Oaxaca on 30 October 2006
Protesters vowed to retake the city centre
Demonstrators and riot police have again clashed in the Mexican city of Oaxaca, the scene of five months of protests against the state governor.

Several thousand protesters converged on the main square, vowing to retake the city centre after police moved in at the weekend to restore order.

Striking teachers and leftist activists are demanding that Governor Ulises Ruiz be sacked for abuse of power.

Mexico's lawmakers have urged Mr Ruiz to quit, but he says he will stay on.

Senators unanimously approved a resolution calling on him to "consider resigning from office to help restore law and order" in Oaxaca.

The Senate's motion came hours after a similar measure was approved by the lower house of the congress.

Within the next few hours we expect life will return to normal in the state capital
Governer Ulises Ruiz

Calls for Mr Ruiz's resignation have been at the heart of a drawn-out protest by Mexican teachers and left-wing activists, who accuse him of authoritarianism and corruption.

Over the weekend, some 4,000 riot police entered Oaxaca, removing demonstrators from the city centre. One man was reported to have died in the operation.

Mexican President Vicente Fox ordered the action on Saturday, a day after gunmen - who protesters say are linked to the local authorities - killed three people, including a US journalist.

Tense stand-off

"Murderers! Murderers!" chanted the demonstrators, as they rallied near the police cordon in the central square of the state capital.

Governor Ulises Ruiz. File photo
Governor Ulises Ruiz has faced five months of protests

"The mood is very tense. We're standing with the protesters in front of police barricades and they have lit bonfire, are tossing fireworks," Mark Stevenson, an Associated Press reporter, told the BBC.

One policeman was reportedly injured by fireworks and taken to hospital.

Police responded with volleys of teargas and used water cannons to extinguish the fires.

Despite the growing pressure both from the protesters and the federal lawmakers, Mr Ruiz - who rejects the accusations against him - said he would not step down.

"Within the next few hours we expect life will return to normal in the state capital," he told reporters on Monday.

The governor also said the Mexican federal parliament had no control over Oaxaca.

Schools shut

The protests began in May, virtually paralysing the city.

The teachers initially staged the walk-out to demand higher pay and better working conditions.

However, after police attacked one of their demonstrations in June, they extended their demands to include a call for the governor's resignation.

The teachers were then joined in their protest by left-wing groups.

Thousands of schools have been closed since the strike began, leaving 1.3 million children out of school.


Are you in Oaxaca? Did you witness the clashes? Send us your comments and eyewitness accounts using the form below. If you have any pictures you can send them to yourpics@bbc.co.uk.

Name:
Email address:
Town and Country:
Phone number (optional):
Comments:

The BBC may edit your comments and cannot guarantee that all emails will be published.




VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
Protesters clash with police in the Mexican city of Oaxaca



SEE ALSO
Q&A: Crisis in Oaxaca
31 Oct 06 |  Americas
Mexico riot police re-take Oaxaca
30 Oct 06 |  Americas
Journalist dies in Mexico protest
28 Oct 06 |  Americas
In pictures: Oaxaca clashes
29 Oct 06 |  In Pictures
Oaxaca teachers vote for return
27 Oct 06 |  Americas
Mexico governor under Senate fire
20 Oct 06 |  Americas
Oaxaca demo reaches Mexico City
10 Oct 06 |  Americas

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit
  • Back to top ^^
  • Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific