[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Languages
Last Updated: Friday, 23 December 2005, 23:25 GMT
Peru signs off Fujimori charges
Alberto Fujimori
Alberto Fujimori denies any wrongdoing
The Peruvian government has approved 12 charges on which it will seek the extradition of former President Alberto Fujimori from Chile.

The move paves the way for Peru to file an extradition request with Chile before a legal deadline of 6 January.

It is not clear which charges against Mr Fujimori have been approved by the Peruvian government.

Mr Fujimori, who denies any wrongdoing, faces charges of corruption and organising death squads in Peru.

The former president has been in custody in Chile since arriving there unexpectedly in November after nearly five years of self-imposed exile in Japan.

He says the charges are aimed at preventing him from standing for president in April's general election.

Charges reviewed

The cabinet approved 12 out of 17 charges proposed by the Supreme Court. The remaining five charges have been sent back to the judiciary for further consideration.

Details of the charges are expected to be released on Saturday, an official told the AFP news agency.

Mr Fujimori - who was president between 1990 and 2000 - fled to Japan after his government was embroiled in a corruption scandal.

From Japan he sent a fax renouncing his post. Peru's congress then barred him from holding any public office until 2011.

Despite the ban, Mr Fujimori has vowed to return to Peru and run for the presidency.


SEE ALSO:
Fujimori barred from 2006 ballot
09 Dec 05 |  Americas
Peru scales down ties with Japan
11 Nov 05 |  Americas
Japan requests access to Fujimori
09 Nov 05 |  Americas
Fujimori is refused bail in Chile
08 Nov 05 |  Americas
Fujimori arrested on Chile visit
07 Nov 05 |  Americas
Profile: Alberto Fujimori
07 Nov 05 |  Americas


RELATED INTERNET LINKS:
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites



PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific