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Last Updated: Saturday, 8 January, 2005, 22:58 GMT
US nuclear submarine runs aground
USS San Francisco (file picture)
The San Francisco's nuclear reactor has not been damaged
A US nuclear submarine has run aground south of the Pacific island of Guam, injuring several sailors on board.

The nuclear reactor on the USS San Francisco was not damaged in the incident, which is currently being investigated, the US Navy said.

One of the sailors is reported to have sustained a serious injury.

The submarine is on its way back to its base on Guam, nearly 600km (350 miles) north of where the incident occurred. It is due to arrive on Monday.

The incident occurred at 0200 GMT on Saturday, the US Navy said in a statement.

"The extent of the injuries and damage aboard San Francisco is still being assessed, but includes one critical injury and several other lesser injuries.

"There were no reports of damage to the reactor plant, which is operating normally.

"The submarine is on the surface and is making best speed back to their homeport in Guam."

Military and Coast Guard aircraft have been sent out to monitor the submarine.

Guam, a territory of the US, is one of the American military's most important bases in the Pacific.

The Los Angeles-class submarines are 109.73m (360 ft) long and are classed as attack vessels, designed to counter enemy submarines or surface vessels. They are equipped with a single nuclear reactor.

The vessels carry a crew of 137.





SEE ALSO:
Submarine crew back on dry land
11 Oct 04 |  Scotland


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