BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Spanish Portuguese Caribbean
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Americas  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Saturday, 8 February, 2003, 01:45 GMT
US citizens given anti-terror advice
Anthrax inspectors on Capitol Hill get hosed down
Different kinds of chemical threats are explained

Having raised the threat level to high, the Bush administration has issued some guidance for the American people as to what to do in the event of a nuclear, biological or chemical attack.

Entitled Are You Ready? the White House guidance runs to 15 pages, offering advice on how to deal with everything from an explosion in a building to an all out nuclear attack, although reassuringly it says the threat of the latter has receded since the end of the Cold War.

The document lists the obvious prime targets for terror attacks: airports, power plants, major landmarks and financial centres.

But it also says hotels and apartment blocks could be vulnerable, which is why families are being urged to keep emergency food and first aid supplies and to learn where the emergency exits are located in their buildings.

'Dirty bomb'

Beyond that, the government recommends its citizens buy battery-operated radios and perhaps even hard hats.

There is a reminder too of the now familiar procedures for dealing with an anthrax attack and hints on decontamination after a chemical alert.

As for a nuclear attack, the government says this would most likely come in the form of the so-called dirty bomb, combining conventional explosives with crude radioactive material.

Such a device, it says, could be delivered in a suitcase.

Finally, if America were to come under full-scale nuclear attack, the official advice is do not look directly at the fireball, then take cover under ground to avoid radioactive fallout.


Key stories

European probe

Background

IN DEPTH
See also:

07 Feb 03 | Americas
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Americas stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Americas stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes