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Monday, 3 February, 2003, 21:01 GMT
Astronaut's touching mail
Clark, Nasa
"Very comfortable in this new, totally different environment"
The text of a moving e-mail from shuttle victim Laurel Clark was released on Monday.

The astronaut from Racine, Wisconsin, was returning from her first trip into space on the Columbia orbiter when the vehicle disintegrated over Texas killing all seven crewmembers on board.

The 41-year-old commander (captain-select) in the US Navy and a naval flight surgeon sent the mail from orbit to family and friends the day before she died:

Moon, Nasa
Columbia's View: One of the reasons people go into space
Hello from above our magnificent planet Earth.

The perspective is truly awe-inspiring. This is a terrific mission and we are very busy doing science round the clock.

Just getting a moment to type e-mail is precious so this will be short, and distributed to many who I know and love.

I have seen some incredible sights: lightning spreading over the Pacific, the Aurora Australis lighting up the entire visible horizon with the cityglow of Australia below, the crescent moon setting over the limb of the Earth, the vast plains of Africa and the dunes on Cape Horn, rivers breaking through tall mountain passes, the scars of humanity, the continuous line of life extending from North America, through Central America and into South America, a crescent moon setting over the limb of our blue planet. Mount Fuji looks like a small bump from up here, but it does stand out as a very distinct landmark.

SHUTTLE CREW
Commander Rick Husband, US
Pilot William McCool, US
Michael Anderson, US
David Brown, US
Kalpana Chawla, US
Laurel Clark, US
Ilan Ramon, Israel
Magically, the very first day we flew over Lake Michigan and I saw Wind Point (Wisconsin) clearly. Haven't been so lucky since.

Every orbit we go over a slightly different part of the Earth. Of course, much of the time I'm working back in Spacehab and don't see any of it.

Whenever I do get to look out, it is glorious. Even the stars have a special brightness. I have seen my friend Orion several times.

Taking photos of the Earth is a real challenge, but a steep learning curve. I think I have finally gotten some beautiful shots the last 2 days. Keeping my fingers crossed that they're in sharp focus.

My near vision has gotten a little worse up here so you may have seen pics/video of me wearing glasses.

I feel blessed to be here representing our country and carrying out the research of scientists around the world. All of the experiments have accomplished most of their goals despite the inevitable hiccups that occur when such a complicated undertaking is undertaken.

Some experiments have even done extra science. A few are finished and one is just getting started today.

Clark, Nasa
Laurel Clark worked long shifts in the shuttle's laboratory
The food is great and I am feeling very comfortable in this new, totally different environment. It still takes a while to eat as gravity doesn't help pull food down your oesophagus.

It is also a constant challenge to stay adequately hydrated. Since our body fluids are shifted toward our heads our sense of thirst is almost non-existent.

Thanks to many of you who have supported me and my adventures throughout the years. This was definitely one to beat all.

I hope you could feel the positive energy that beamed to the whole planet as we glided over our shared planet.

Love to all, Laurel.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Matt Frei
"A nation at half-mast"
The BBC's Emma Simpson
"There was little indication of the catastrophe about to happen"
The BBC's Nick Adcock
"At the critical stage of shuttle re-entry, nothing can be done to correct a significant failure"

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03 Feb 03 | Americas
03 Feb 03 | South Asia
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