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Friday, January 22, 1999 Published at 03:39 GMT


World: Americas

Dan Quayle stands for White House

Funny feeling of deja vu: Dan Quayle is sworn in as Vice President

Former vice president Dan Quayle has announced that he is to seek the Republican nomination for president of the United States.

Mr Quayle spent four years as vice president to George Bush until the pair were beaten by Bill Clinton and Al Gore in 1992.

Announcing his intention to run for the White House in 2000, Mr Quayle said that he believed he had the financial backing and the policies that would clinch him the Republican ticket.


[ image: Like father like son? George Bush Jnr]
Like father like son? George Bush Jnr
Speaking to the US news network CNN, Mr Quayle said that he was forming a campaign committee for the presidency, confirming stories in the Indiana Star and News newspaper, which his family owns.

He said he had the backing of his wife whom he described as a great campaigner after her experience with him on the vice president trail.

And he predicted that he was about to prove his frequent critics wrong.

"It's a big difference for me this time around," he said, speaking on the Larry King Live show.

"I can raise the money, I have been through a number of campaigns and raised the money to get my message through."

Bush v Quayle?

Dan Quayle entered the US Congress in 1976 and went on to become an Indiana Senator in 1980, until becoming George Bush's running mate in 1988.

During his time in office he became a target for political satirists, famously misspelling the word "potato" while visiting an elementary school class.

His announcement to stand may also result in an intriguing battle against George Bush's son and governor of Texas, George Bush Jnr, who is also reportedly considering running for the White House.

Sex an issue


[ image: The man to beat: Al Gore expected on Democrat ticket]
The man to beat: Al Gore expected on Democrat ticket
Mr Quayle predicted that the Senate would not convict President Bill Clinton over the Monica Lewinsky affair - but that his conduct would be a campaign issue, particularly because incumbent vice president Al Gore is expected to run on the Democrat ticket.

"(The President's) conduct went from a private sexual matter to one of perjury and criminal conduct," he said.

"That's what the trial is about, lying under oath. You can't do it when you raise that hand."

He also expected journalists to investigate the sex lives of candidates whether or not it was relevant.

Launching an early attack on Al Gore, Mr Quayle described this year's State of the Union address as bearing the "fingerprints" of the vice president - and all the hallmarks of Democrat-style big government that was ruining America.



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Internet Links


US Senate: Dan Quayle biography

Dan Quayle Centre and Museum


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