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Thursday, 31 October, 2002, 04:19 GMT
Canadians warned about visiting US
Canadian deputy Prime Minister Herbert Gray with US Attorney General John Ashcroft at their border
The US tightened border controls to keep militants out

The Canadian Government has issued a travel advisory to its citizens about visiting the United States.

Because of tightened border controls in America, Canadians born in some Middle Eastern countries should now think carefully before entering the United States, Ottawa says.


We can't tell the Americans what to do on their own territory. What we're telling them is that we don't accept this and we find it very troubling

Canadian Foreign Minister Bill Graham
American border regulations introduced last month require that people born in Iran, Iraq, Libya, Sudan or Syria be photographed and fingerprinted as they enter the US - even if they are now full citizens of other countries, including Canada.

That has prompted the travel warning from the Canadian Government.

This week it advised its citizens who were born in any of the five countries to "consider carefully whether they should attempt to enter the US for any reason, including transit to or from third countries".

'Second-class Canadians'

In the Canadian parliament on Wednesday, politicians accused Washington of harassing Arab-Canadians.

One Syrian-born member of parliament said the American rules make him a second-class Canadian.

Canadian Foreign Minister Bill Graham says he has already registered his strongest disapproval to US Secretary of State Colin Powell.

He added that he believes changes will be made to the American move when common sense prevails.

The American regulations come as a convenient target for Canadian politicians who sense growing unease amongst Canadians with US policy in the Middle East.

Many Canadians also worry about increased administration and delays at the border, which can be expensive for their export businesses.


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04 Sep 02 | Americas
29 Aug 02 | Americas
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