BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Spanish Portuguese Caribbean
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Americas  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 6 August, 2002, 19:29 GMT 20:29 UK
11 September ceremony unveiled
The World Trade Center site 10 days after the attack
Victims' families will tread Ground Zero for the first time

The names of all 2,800 people killed in the terrorist attacks of 11 September will be read out during a ceremony in New York to mark the year anniversary.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg and State Governor George Pataki announced details of the ceremony on Tuesday, saying 4,500 people had made ''remarkable and thoughtful'' contributions on a public hotline.

The ceremony will begin at 0846 at Ground Zero, exactly one year since the north World Trade Center tower was hit by American Airlines Flight 11.

The names of the dead will then be read aloud, some by the former mayor of New York, Rudolph Giuliani, and others by relatives of the victims.

Bagpipe procession

Family members will be allowed onto the World Trade Center site for the first time. Many of them regard it as a burial ground.

Workers remove the last beam from Ground Zero in May
Part of the ceremony will honour the fallen rescue workers

Each of the families will put a rose in a vase for an arrangement that will later form part of the permanent memorial.

The ceremony is set to last for 102 minutes, the exact length of time between the impact of the first plane and the collapse of the second tower.

The day will start with a bagpipe procession from each of the five boroughs that will honour the rescue workers killed.

Sombre and highly symbolic, the Ground Zero ceremony will also include readings from the Declaration of Independence and the Gettysburg Address, the founding texts of American democracy.


September 11 will live in people's hearts and minds for generations just as December 7

New York Governor George Pataki

Places of worship will be encouraged to toll their bells and to open their doors to people who need them.

President George W Bush will visit New York later in the day and visiting heads of state will observe the lighting of an eternal flame.

But as Mr Bloomberg announced, it will be a working day for schools and businesses, a sign that the city has triumphed even as it is thinking of those it has lost.

Governor Pataki said: ''September 11, that date, will live in people's hearts and minds for generations just as the date December 7 will never be forgotten even by people who were not alive when it happened.''

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
Micheal Bloomberg, New York Mayor
"My predecessor Mayor Giuliani will lead the reading of names"
See also:

21 Jul 02 | Americas
16 Jul 02 | Americas
16 Jul 02 | Americas
31 May 02 | Americas
11 Mar 02 | Breakfast
31 Dec 01 | Americas
13 Sep 01 | Americas
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Americas stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Americas stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes