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Sunday, 12 May, 2002, 03:02 GMT 04:02 UK
Venezuelans march against Chavez
Anti-Chavez protester
Protesters wore black to mourn deaths a month ago
About 100,000 people have marched through the Venezuelan capital Caracas to protest against President Hugo Chavez, who was briefly ousted by rebel troops in April before being restored to power.

The rally was in memory of 17 people killed in a big anti-government march before the unsuccessful coup.

The authorities have promised an impartial investigation into the deaths, but critics of Mr Chavez say it is being led by a state prosecutor loyal to him.

In a different part of the city pro-Chavez groups marched on the prosecutor's office to demand a quick investigation into who started the violence.

The anti-Chavez demonstrators wore black to mark their disappointment at his return to power and chanted slogans such as "We are here and we're not afraid".

Banners carried messages saying "Chavez murderer" and "Forgetting is forbidden".

BBC correspondent Adam Easton in Caracas says the demonstration is a clear sign that the country is more polarised than ever.

Our correspondent says Mr Chavez's biggest test is to convince his opponents to work with him instead of against him.

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The BBC's Nick Miles
"It's difficult to see how the two Venezuelas can reconcile their different agendas."
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