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Friday, 22 March, 2002, 16:25 GMT
More rescuers' remains found at WTC
Body removed from Ground Zero
Work is halted when the remains of a uniformed officer are found
The remains of as many as 10 more firefighters, including one of the department's highest ranking officers have been recovered from the wreckage of the World Trade Center, officials have said.

Assistant Chief Donald Burns, 61, was among seven fire fighters found early on Thursday morning, said fire department spokesman Mike Prendergast.

Officer Moira Smith helps a man from the World Trade Center
Officer Smith was killed minutes after this photo
The remains of what appeared to be another three firefighters were found late on Thursday evening. Two civilians were also found, Mr Prendergast said.

On Wednesday the remains of Moira Smith, the only New York City policewoman killed in the 11 September attacks, were found along with those of two court officers and two Port Authority police officers.

Bravery awards

Assistant Chief Burns was setting up a command post at the scene of the disaster when the south tower collapsed. His remains were identified from dental records, fire department spokesman Frank Gribbon said.

Burns' career as a firefighter lasted 39 years, during which time he received bravery awards five times.

The New York Fire Department lost 343 members in the attacks, of whom about 160 have been recovered and identified.

Officer Moira Smith was only the second policewoman killed in the line of duty in the history of the New York Police Department.

Her name tag and shield were discovered near her remains, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said.

Good Samaritan

Smith had been working in a Manhattan police station when the planes struck the World Trade Center and she rushed down to the scene voluntarily.

She was captured by a news photographer helping a bleeding man out of the burning south tower and heard over her police radio directing people to safety.

Moments later the tower collapsed and she was killed, along with her police partner Robert Fazio.

Workers are now excavating a six-storey high pile of debris - all that remains of the south tower, which collapsed first.

When the remains of a uniformed officer are found all work is temporarily halted and the remains removed on a stretcher covered with an American flag while colleagues salute.

See also:

12 Mar 02 | Americas
US marks six months after attacks
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