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Wednesday, 6 February, 2002, 15:44 GMT
Charges facing 'American Taleban'
John Walker Lindh
Walker is said to have met Osama Bin Laden
John Walker Lindh, the US citizen accused of fighting alongside the Afghan Taleban, has been formally indicted on 10 charges. The man who has become known as the "American Taleban" - identified in the charge sheet as the person also known by the names of Suleyman al-Faris and Abdul Hamid - stands accused of:

Count One: Conspiracy to Murder United States Nationals.

The Grand Jury - the body deciding if there is "probable cause" to believe a crime has been committed - charges: "From in or about May 2001 through in or about December 2001, outside the United States and outside the jurisdiction of any particular state and district, the defendant, John Phillip Walker Lindh, with others known and unknown to the Grand Jury, did engage in a conspiracy to kill nationals of the United States, including civilians and military personnel, by committing murder."

It says this was "a part of the conspiracy that members and associates of al-Qaeda would commit terrorist acts and kill American citizens around the world."

"It was a part of the conspiracy that members and associates of al-Qaeda and the Taleban would violently oppose and kill American military personnel and other United States Government employees serving in Afghanistan after the 11 September attacks."

The charges specify how Mr Walker joined the Taleban and went to Afghanistan to a recruiting centre to proceed to an al-Qaeda training centre in May or June 2001 - staying at a guest house belonging to Osama Bin Laden in the southern Afghan city of Kandahar during this period.

"In or about June or July 2001, [Walker] LINDH met personally with Bin Laden, who thanked him and other trainees for taking part in jihad."

After being trained, Mr Walker was alleged to have been allocated to a unit fighting Northern Alliance troops and remained with the group even after the 11 September attacks on the US "despite having been told that Bin Laden had ordered the attacks, that additional terrorist attacks were planned, and that additional al-Qaeda personnel were being sent from the training camps to the front lines to protect Bin Laden and defend against an anticipated military response from the United States."

Count Two: Conspiracy to Provide Material Support and Resources to Harakat ul-Mujahideen (HUM) - a Pakistan-based militant group fighting in the disputed region of Kashmir.

Count Three: Providing Material Support and Resources to HUM.

Count Four: Conspiracy To Provide Material Support and Resources to al-Qaeda.

Count Five: Providing Material Support and Resources to al-Qaeda.

Count Six: Conspiracy to Contribute Services to al-Qaeda.

The Grand Jury charges that Mr Walker "did willfully violate a regulation issued under Chapter 35 of Title 50, United States Code, ... did conspire to willfully and unlawfully make a contribution of services to and for the benefit of al-Qaeda, a specially designated terrorist organisation".

Count Seven: Contributing Services to al-Qaeda.

Count Eight: Conspiracy to Supply Services to the Taleban.

Under this count, Mr Walker is charged that he "did conspire to willfully and unlawfully supply services to the Taleban, to the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taleban, and to persons whose property and interests in property were blocked pursuant to Title 3 1, Code of Federal Regulations, Section 545.201".

Count Nine: Supplying Services to the Taleban.

Count Ten: Using, Carrying and Possessing Firearms and Destructive Devices Daring Crimes of violence.

The Grand Jury says that the accused, Mr Walker, "did knowingly use, carry, and possess firearms, namely, an AKM rifle, an RFK rifle, and at least two grenades that were destructive devices under Title 18, United States Code, Section 924(c)(l)(B)(ii), during, in relation to, and in furtherance of crimes of violence for which the defendant may be prosecuted in a court of the United States".


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Background

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See also:

06 Feb 02 | Americas
24 Jan 02 | Americas
24 Jan 02 | Americas
30 Jul 98 | Clinton Scandal
18 Jan 02 | Middle East
16 Jan 02 | Americas
16 Jan 02 | Americas
14 Dec 01 | Americas
05 Dec 01 | Americas
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