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Wednesday, 26 September, 2001, 09:50 GMT 10:50 UK
US missile cash for anti-terror war
George Bush with Colin Powell and treasury secretary Paul O'Neill
President Bush has been given more funds to fight 'terrorism'
The US is to switch money from its missile defence programme to anti-terrorism measures after the attacks on Washington and New York.

Correspondents say President George W Bush was clearly delighted when the House of Representatives approved a $344bn defence spending bill by 398 votes to 17.

The house agreed to shift $400m from the $8bn missile defence budget and to use it on counter-terrorism measures and waging an offensive on those behind the 11 September attacks.

A test missile is fired
The missile defence programme has been championed by President Bush
Nearly 7,000 people are missing or dead following the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

"I am pleased that the house has taken the vital step to secure our nation's security by passing the defence authorisation bill," Mr Bush said.

Mr Bush is putting more than $6bn into anti-terrorism initiatives.

Other money is being spent on improving pay and conditions for members of the US armed forces.

Members of the house put aside their differences over the missile defence budget in another show of unity and support for the Bush administration.

The Senate also agreed last week to avoid a battle over Mr Bush's missile defence plan. It dropped a Democratic-backed provision that would require congressional approval for tests that violated the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty.

The Senate gave Mr Bush the option of spending $1.3bn of the missile defence budget on anti-terrorism measures.

Security stepped up

Bob Stump, an Arizona Republican who heads the House Armed Services Committee, described the funds as a "down payment" on the struggle against terrorism.

In a separate development, security along the US border with Canada is to be increased in the light of the attacks.

US Attorney General John Ashcroft said the US had not been vigilant enough in patrolling the border.

His remarks were seized upon by Canadian opposition parties, who have accused their government of poor security and immigration controls.


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24 Sep 01 | Business
16 Jul 01 | Europe
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