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Tuesday, 8 October, 2002, 10:39 GMT 11:39 UK
Terror in US schools and workplaces
Flowers and bullet hole after one of the Maryland shootings
The US has a long and tragic history of shootings
The string of sniper shootings in the Washington area is the latest in a long history of violent gun attacks in the United States.

On 5 March 2001 a pupil opened fire at a school in California, killing two students and injuring 13 others.

The teenager was later sentenced to 50 years in prison.

On 26 December 2000, a man shot dead seven people at an internet company in Wakefield, Massachusetts.

Police charged a company employee, 42-year-old Michael McDermott, who was found with an AK-47, a shotgun and a handgun sitting in the lobby.

On 29 February 2000, the shooting of a six-year-old Michigan schoolgirl by one of her classmates pushed the gun law issue to the centre of the presidential election campaign.

A six-year-old boy killed Kayla Rolland in front of a teacher and 22 other school pupils, using a .32 semi-automatic handgun. Police said the gun was illegally owned by the boy's uncle.

In November 1999 two people were killed and two others wounded when a man opened fire at a shipyard office in Seattle, Washington.

Earlier that month 40-year-old Byran Uyesugi, a disgruntled Xerox corporation worker, killed seven people in Honolulu, Hawaii.

In September 1999 three people were shot dead at a hospital in Anaheim, California by Dung Trinh. Police said he was angry about his mother's death.

On 5 August the same year three people were killed in Pelham, Alabama, when a 34-year-old man opened fire at his workplace.

Shooting rampage

Eight days earlier, nine people were killed when trader Mark Barton went on a shooting rampage at two local stock trading firms in Atlanta, Georgia after first killing his wife and two children. He later turned the gun on himself.

Students from Santana High School, California hug each other
The Santana school suspect had reportedly been teased
On 11 June 1999 three people were killed and four others wounded by a gunman who opened fire at a busy suburban Detroit office building in Southfield, Michigan.

Two months earlier, Sergei Babarrin, 70, was shot dead by police marksmen after walking into the Mormon church's Family History Museum library in Salt Lake City, Utah and opening fire, killing two people.

In the same month, two student gunmen killed 12 other students and a teacher at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado before killing themselves.

Capitol shooting

In July 1998 a gunman with a history of mental illness blasted his way into the US Capitol in Washington DC, killing two police officers before being shot and captured.

Gun shop
The availability of guns has come under scrutiny
In March 1988, a state lottery worker shot four state lottery executives and then killed himself in Newington, Connecticut.

In December 1997 at Heath High School in West Paducah, Kentucky, a 14-year-old boy killed three students attending a prayer meeting in December 1997.

Two months earlier, at Pearl High School in Pearl, Mississippi, a 16-year-old boy fatally stabbed his mother at home, then went to school and shot to death two students, including his former girlfriend.

America and the gun

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08 Oct 02 | Americas
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