BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: World: Africa
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-------------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-------------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Thursday, 17 August, 2000, 17:00 GMT 18:00 UK
Tutu returns for quiet life
Tutu: Retiring from public life
Tutu: Retiring from public life
The ailing former Archbishop of Cape Town, Desmond Tutu, has returned to South Africa after almost two years in the United States.

One of the heroes of the struggle against apartheid, he went to America as a visiting professor - but also to receive treatment for prostate cancer.

He is still confident of recovering, but he has returned a frailer man, and says he is ready to withdraw from public life.

"I want to come home to sleep. We have a cadre of outstanding new leaders. We oldies, certainly I, should give them space to show off their worth," he said.

"It is now time I move away from centre stage."

Legacy

His legacy will not be forgotten.


Always humble: Tying a photographer's shoelace at the airport
As a leader of the black liberation struggle inside South Africa, Archbishop Tutu gave a voice to the oppressed - especially those living in townships around Cape Town.

The 69-year-old Anglican archbishop won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 for his role in fighting white rule and he helped bring international attention to the injustices of apartheid.

He then chaired the Truth and Reconciliation Commission which investigated apartheid-era abuses and gave amnesty to those who confessed their involvement.

He told journalists on his return that the United States, which had not fully dealt with its legacy of slavery, could benefit by setting up a similar commission, before which African and native Americans could tell of their experiences of discrimination.

Alongside Nelson Mandela, Archbishop Tutu holds a special place in the hearts of all South Africans.

They will be glad he has returned home, but sad that this giant of the anti-apartheid struggle is finally retiring from public life.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

14 Jun 99 | South Africa elections
1994 - 99: The Mandela years
30 Oct 98 | Truth and Reconciliation
Desmond Tutu's long crusade
28 Jun 98 | Africa
Tutu awarded Legion of Honour
Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories