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The BBC's Anna Borzello
"About 50% of the population have voted"
 real 28k

Vincent Magombe of African Inform International
"It doesn't show an unanimity"
 real 28k

Saturday, 1 July, 2000, 16:55 GMT 17:55 UK
Ugandans vote for no-party rule
Yoweri Museveni
Museveni's one-party rule looks set to stay
Ugandans have overwhelmingly rejected multi-party politics in favour of continuing with President Yoweri Museveni's "no-party" system, according to provisional national results.

With about 88% of votes counted, the electoral commission said 91% of voters favoured retaining the National Resistance Movement as the country's political system.

The turnout for the referendum was low, at about 50% of the population. In some areas the turnout was as low as 11%.

It was not clear whether this was in response to opposition calls for a boycott the referendum, or simply due to voter apathy.

Repercussions

Mr Museveni claims that party politics splits under-developed countries like Uganda along ethnic and tribal lines.

His opponents argue that this does not justify restricting their activity and advocated a boycott of the referendum.

Whatever the outcome, the opposition Democratic Party have said they will not respect the referendum results.

They warn that if Mr Museveni does not return Uganda to pluralist rule, the repercussions will be very detrimental to the country.

International donors

A group of western donors that had contributed $4.5m to the cost of holding the referendum echoed this fear.

"The group of donors emphasises the importance of ensuring that the movement system does not evolve into a de facto one-party state," a statement said.

"Experience shows that such development would not be in the interest of transparent and accountable government in Uganda."

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