Languages
Page last updated at 12:24 GMT, Monday, 7 July 2008 13:24 UK

Niger signs power deal with China

File photo of installations near a uranium mine in Arlit, Niger
Chinese companies are interested in Niger's reserves of uranium

The government in Niger has signed an agreement for China to help improve the country's power supplies.

China will transfer several electrical power units to Niger under the agreement, officials said.

The deal comes as Niger's cities have been experiencing power outages, partly due to problems in supply from Nigeria.

Chinese companies have recently become more active in Niger, exploring for uranium and oil in the north and east of the country.

Government officials said the power units were being dismantled in China prior to their transfer, the BBC's Idy Baraou reports from Niger.

Each unit is expected to provide 15-20 megawatts (MW) of power.

"We hope that this new equipment could help increase the production of electric power by about 30% for the region of (the capital) Niamey, which means we will be able to provide between 50 and 60 megawatts," said Hamidu Mamudu, head of Niamey's existing power plant.

An official from Niger's state power company was also travelling to Asia to purchase new parts for Niger's ageing infrastructure.

Meanwhile, Niger's government says it is investing about $4m for short-term improvements to the country's power grid.

Demand for power in Niger has been increasing.

Niger, a major producer of uranium, is also one of the world's poorest nations.


SEE ALSO
Niger set to become oil producer
03 Jun 08 |  Business
Q&A: Tuareg unrest
07 Sep 07 |  Africa
Country profile: Niger
18 Jun 08 |  Country profiles

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific