BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Languages
Last Updated: Thursday, 7 February 2008, 12:52 GMT
Congo warlord flown to The Hague
Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui
Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui's militia disarmed and he joined the army
A ex-rebel leader from the Democratic Republic of Congo has been flown to The Hague to face war crimes charges at the International Criminal Court (ICC).

Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui, now a colonel in the Congolese army, was arrested on Wednesday, a court statement said.

He is alleged to have planned a brutal attack by his National Integrationist Front (FNI) fighters on Bogoro village in eastern Ituri region in 2003.

He is the third Congolese warlord to be sent to The Hague.

Child soldiers

Some 200 civilians were murdered in the attack on Bogoro on 24 February 2003.

Col Ngudjolo's arrest warrant lists nine counts:

Map

  • Three counts of crimes against humanity including murder, inhumane acts and sexual slavery
  • Six counts of war crimes including the use of children soldiers.
  • Prosecutors allege the Bogoro attack - committed together with the Patriotic Resistance Force in Ituri (FRPI) group - was part of a systematic campaign in 2003 directed against Ituri's ethnic Hema people by the majority Lendu community.

    Fighting in the gold-rich Ituri region broke out in 1999 and continued until 2003.

    The BBC's Mark Doyle says the conflict in Ituri manifests itself as an ethnic war, but its root cause is the criminal mining of the region's gold and other minerals.

    An estimated 50,000 people were killed and hundreds of thousands left homeless.

    Under a peace deal, several Congolese militias have disarmed and been integrated into the national army.

    SEE ALSO

    RELATED INTERNET LINKS
    The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites



    FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
    Has China's housing bubble burst?
    How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
    Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

    PRODUCTS & SERVICES

    Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific