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Last Updated: Thursday, 31 January 2008, 18:20 GMT
Kericho eyewitness: 'Smoke fills the air'
Angry mob in Kenyan

Edwin, 21 describes the inter-ethnic violence he saw erupt in Kericho in the Rift Valley following news that their constituency's minister of parliament, David Kimutai Too from the opposition Orange Democratic Movement, had been killed in Eldoret.

The death of David Too, better known here as the Principal, has awakened new attacks.

Kericho was considered by many residents to be cooling down compared to other towns and district around us.

Police have been driving around in jeeps telling everybody to go home and get inside to try calm things down.

Earlier, I stood on the roof of a building in town and watched a village two kilometres away called Nyagacho burning down.

My mother and father are both in Nyagacho. I'm not with them because they think it is not safe for me.

But we have no other place we can call home.

Ashes

The majority of the perpetrators are Kalenjin [ethnic group] men - they are burning everything in their path in what can only be termed revenge-fuelled mania.

All that remains for one Kenyan school after being attacked

They assume that members of the Kikuyus [ethnic group] are behind the murder of Mr Too.

It may also be feelings of jealously because Kikuyus own businesses in the town.

Now, smoke fills the air, and it is hard to see where the land and the sky meet.

As people watch the houses that they called home reduce to ashes, we can only pray and move out of the way and hope that whoever is working on stopping this wave of violence, if indeed someone is, will succeed in saving us all.

It pains me that Kenya has come to this. We used to be a peaceful country - refugees came here for help.

Before the election, tribe lived with tribe. My father is a Kalenjin and my mother is a Kikuyu.

I set up a cyber-cafe just before the election, but this violence is making normal life and business impossible.

Peace is the most important thing now, not protests over the elections. I hope our leaders see the sense to try to calm the situation down.

I want to be able to sleep without fear of my home being burned.





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