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Last Updated: Wednesday, 5 December 2007, 19:09 GMT
Court widens Darfur investigation
Luis Moreno-Ocampo
Mr Moreno-Ocampo has issued two arrest warrants over Darfur
The International Criminal Court will investigate attacks both on civilians and international personnel in Darfur, its chief prosecutor has said.

Luis Moreno-Ocampo also criticised Sudan for failing to hand over two war crimes suspects, and even promoting one of them since his indictment.

Warrants were issued in February for government minister Ahmed Haroun and Janjaweed militia leader Ali Kushayb.

Sudan accused the prosecutor of "moral and professional bankruptcy".

The country does not recognise the authority of the ICC and appointed Mr Haroun to investigate humanitarian abuses in Darfur.

'Rape and murder'

Mr Moreno-Ocampo said one investigation would look at the alleged responsibility of Sudanese government officials for attacks on 2.5 million civilians.

Sudanese Minister of State for Humanitarian Affairs Ahmed Haroun
Ahmed Haroun is now Sudan's human rights monitor

It would investigate "a calculated, organised campaign by Sudanese officials to attack individuals and further destroy the social fabric of entire communities", he said.

The other inquiry, he added, would look at attacks on humanitarian workers and UN peacekeepers such as that on 29 October, 10 African Union soldiers were killed at the Haskanita military base in Darfur.

Aid workers are increasingly becoming targets as the rebel groups who have been fighting the Sudanese government splinter.

The prosecutor urged the UN Security Council to demand that Sudan hand over Mr Haroun.

"When will be a better time to arrest Haroun?" he asked.

"How many more women, girls, have to be raped? How many more persons have to be killed?"

Sudan defiant

On Wednesday, the Sudanese Ambassador to the UN, Abdelmahmood Abdalhaleem Mohamed, reiterated his government's intransigent line.

"There is no way we are going to surrender our people to the ICC," he said.

Human rights groups say the UN Security Council has not put as much pressure on the Sudanese as it might.

The Security Council is trying to get peacekeepers deployed in Darfur.

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