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Last Updated: Thursday, 25 October 2007, 19:25 GMT 20:25 UK
Darfur camp: Your questions
Composite image of Darfuris [Pics: Mohammed Nureldine]

What do you want to know about life in Darfur?

Four-and-a-half years of fighting between Sudan's government, pro-government Arab militias and rebel groups in the Sudanese region of Darfur has driven more than 2m people from their homes.

The BBC's Amber Henshaw has been at the Abu Shouk camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of El Fasher in north Darfur.

She has put your questions to six of the camp's residents.

Their answers will be published later on Friday 26 October.

We are no longer accepting questions for this event, but here is a selection of the ones we have received:


Firstly, I have to say I admire all of you and the enormous strength you have. Even if one feels lost and helpless, it takes a lot of power for one to survive another day. My question is: What is it that "keeps you going every day", is there any hope for a better future left or are most of you discouraged by impossibility to take control over your lives? If there is hope left, what do you hope for? Thank you. Sandra, Kosice

On average, how many family members has each survivor lost? Harmik Avedian, US

Considering that the Sudan area is seen as one of the worst case scenarios for human rights violations in the world, is there any time or demand for fun, excitement, or play-time in the camp? Chris Harvey, Copenhagen

Hawa - I'm currently at university too. I would like to know what it's like trying to attend university and study within the IDP camp. Laura, Copenhagen

1. How is the situation in the camp during the last year? Has it improved, did it become more dangerous to live there? Is fighting going on between People of the Camp and militias/police/army? 2.: What would improve the situation on the ground? Murabeer, Kassel

Khaled, as an economic and political science student, what do you think as everlasting solution to the problem in Darfur? How could that solution work to bring peace for all Sudanese? Alieu Sannoh, DR Congo

Women who are being raped often don't get accepted by their family because of the shame. Are people in Sudan working on this matter -teaching to accept raped women? Wolter, Amsterdam

My fellow brothers / sisters, I was once a refugee during my country's 14 years of nightmare and I know what it mean to be a refugee!!!! How is the food ration, education, social facilities, security, the rule of law and over all freedom of in the camp. So many NGOs but many times, no food, no educational facilities not to talk about security and the rule of law┐. as i listen to the BBC your situation reflects our terrible past.... Samuel Sakama, Monrovia, Liberia

What was life like (describe a day) before you were displaced? This question is especially for Khadijah. I'd also like to know how a year was like, the yearly rhythm of life. What were the high lights of life as the year unfolded. (This question is for all of you.) Susannah Gachoka, Nairobi, Kenya

I'm wondering where someone like Hawa finds the funds to afford fees for University.Steven Laredo, Nantucket, Massachusetts, USA

Some world leaders have said that the root cause of the crisis in Darfur is global warming and the ensuing competition for scare resources in the region. Others have described the situation as a civil war due to long-standing tribal tensions. Do you feel that either of these analyses accurately explain the reasons behind the conflict in Darfur?
Susan Morgan, Wellesley, USA

Do you know what the major differences are between the rebels and the government? Why are Muslims fighting each other?
Goolam Dawood, Johannesburg, South Africa

What would you like to see happen after the war, that will make you feel that justice has been done? Would you like to see anything happen to the perpetrators of these crimes, would you like the government to do something for you and your family specifically or would you like the government to do something big for the whole community?
Achieng Akena, Kampala, Uganda





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