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Thursday, 24 February, 2000, 18:13 GMT
Monkeys 'stone man to death'


There are reports of East African monkeys befriending humans


Monkeys are being blamed for the death of a herder in north-east Kenya who died from severe head injuries "inflicted by flying missiles".

The unusual attack is reported to have taken place because a group of herders and their animals were monopolising a watering hole preventing a troop of monkeys from getting near enough to have a drink.

The East African Standard said the incident occurred on Sunday on a mountain in northern Wajir District.

Mohammed Abdi Gosho, a nurse at trading centre just 3km away, told the newspaper that the man died from "severe head injuries".

He said that because of the drought, nearby dams had dried up leaving the spring as the only source of water for miles around for local residents and for wildlife.

The man, Ali Adam Hussein, was buried at the trading centre by shocked residents, the paper said.

Reports of attacks by animals on humans using weapons of any kind are extremely rare.

The area is close to the Somali border, with guns and reports of killings common.
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