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Sunday, 2 January, 2000, 13:16 GMT
Gambia weathers Y2K risk
The Gambia's official web site is functioning normally
The tiny West African republic of The Gambia has not suffered any significant Y2K problems so far, despite predictions that it was in line for serious disruption.

The Washington-based Y2K Cooperation Center, set up to monitor effects of the bug around the world, had warned that significant power cuts were threatening to affect the Gambian energy sector.

Although there were some power cuts reported, they were no more serious than usual.

The Gambia's national Y2K coordinator Baba Mustafa Marong said he was not aware of any Y2K problems in the sectors of telecommunications, water, electricity, air transport or banking.

"So far we have not come across any problem with the millennium bug. Everything is intact," he said.

There were no problems reported at the airport in the capital, Banjul, with planes taking off and landing as scheduled from the afternoon of 1 January.

No flights had been scheduled during the morning.

The airport is used by the American space agency Nasa as a contingency landing place for its space shuttles.

Monday was declared a national holiday to allow time for working on any Y2K problems which might have arisen.

There was concern about The Gambia's preparedness after funds from the United Nations to fix the customs and internal revenue computer systems were delayed.

The Y2K Cooperation Center warned that The Gambia's official computer systems could still face problems when normal work resumes after the new year holiday.

See also:

01 Jan 00 | Business
01 Jan 00 | Science/Nature
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