Europe South Asia Asia Pacific Americas Middle East Africa BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: World: Africa
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-----------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-----------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Sport 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Simon Taylor, Director of Global Witness
"There is a duty upon the oil companies to become more transparent"
 real 28k

Thursday, 9 December, 1999, 13:51 GMT
Angola fights oil corruption allegations
Global Witness says oil revenues are funding the war


By Luanda correspondent Lara Pawson

The Angolan government is pursuing legal action against British pressure group Global Witness.

Angola
The non-profit outfit launched a damning report last Sunday about Angola's billion dollar oil industry. The Angolan government says it is both speculative and defamatory.

Allegations of corruption against senior Angolan officials were detailed in the report which also criticised international oil companies for their compliance.

"We have the lawyers in Portugal and London who are going to deal with this" said Angola's presidential spokesman, Aldemiro Vaz de Conceicao on Thursday.

A front page report in the state-run daily newspaper Jornal de Angola, states that the Angolan government will not be intimidated by what it describes as the Global Witness campaign.

Lack of transparency

The 21-page report is certainly bold.

An oil worker in Angola Angola's has some of the largest offshore reserves in the world
It claims for example that the Angolan president must take responsibility for the lack of transparency alleged to characterise Angola's petroleum industry.

Experts recently predicted that the country's oil resources will outstrip Nigeria's in terms of production within two years.

Petroleum resources provide the government with vast sums of money from which to fund its war effort against Jonas Savimbi's rebel Unita group.

Global Witness argues that the funds would be better spent on humanitarian and social projects.

The Angolan government has disputed this, pointing out that Britain used oil resources to fund its role in the Balkans.

Several observers have countered this with the fact that in Angola, unlike Britain, the public is denied access to the government's accounts.

Notwithstanding that, the Angolan government is pursuing both criminal and civil action, and says it will force Global Witness to prove the accuracy of its report described by the Jornal de Angola as "sordid and Machiavellian".

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
Africa Contents

Country profiles

See also:
05 Dec 99 |  Africa
Oil firms 'funding' Angolan conflict
04 Nov 98 |  Africa
Oil fuels Angola's civil war
03 Jan 99 |  Africa
A war fuelled by the earth's riches
04 Dec 99 |  Africa
US envoy wants action against Unita

Internet links:

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
Links to other Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories