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Last Updated: Tuesday, 28 June, 2005, 15:13 GMT 16:13 UK
UK, US 'caused Zimbabwe droughts'
Crops destroyed by drought
The Herald says the weather has been artificially manipulated
A state-run newspaper in Zimbabwe has suggested the UK and US are to blame for droughts in southern Africa.

The Herald said climate change has been artificially induced "in a bid to arm-twist the region to capitulate to the whims of the world's superpowers".

It said weather was being manipulated for political gain using unspecified "unconventional" chemical weapons.

It is widely seen as a mouthpiece for President Robert Mugabe's government, correspondents say.

It said recent droughts, which defied predictions by the Zimbabwean government and the Southern African Development Community's Drought Monitoring Centre, pointed to the possibility of the weather being manipulated for political purposes.

"The overt and covert machinations by Zimbabwe's former colonial ruler Britain, which has declared its intentions to effect illegal regime change in Harare, have given credence to the conspiracy theory," the paper said.

It said that the US Famine Early Warning System had predicted famine in Zimbabwe six months before it occurred.

"The prediction, which was the exact opposite of other forecasts, seems to confirm that the conspiracy to remove the Zimbabwean government has gone chemical."

Zimbabwe is currently facing a food crisis and the country urgently needs to import 1.2 million tonnes of food to avoid famine.

Correspondents say the crisis is complex with erratic rains, disastrous economic policies, land reform and the spread of HIV/Aids all playing a part.


SEE ALSO:
Zimbabwe moves to bring in food
28 Apr 05 |  Africa
Country profile: Zimbabwe
02 Apr 05 |  Country profiles


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