Europe South Asia Asia Pacific Americas Middle East Africa BBC Homepage World Service Education



Front Page

World

UK

UK Politics

Business

Sci/Tech

Health

Education

Sport

Entertainment

Talking Point

In Depth

On Air

Archive
Feedback
Low Graphics
Help

Friday, September 17, 1999 Published at 13:21 GMT 14:21 UK


World: Africa

Analysis: Bouteflika emerges victorious

The Algerian people have had enough of burying their dead

By Jim Muir in Algiers

Official returns from the referendum on the peace plan put forward by President Abdelaziz Bouteflika say it received overwhelming support.


[ image: The president received overwhelming support for his plan to end the country's brutal conflict]
The president received overwhelming support for his plan to end the country's brutal conflict
Mr Bouteflika could hardly have hoped for a better set of figures - they showed an overall turnout of 85% of the electorate across the country, with more than 98% of the votes cast in favour of his peace plan.

Algeria is a country where voting figures are often regarded with suspicion. But there is no doubt that the vast bulk of the people are sick and tired of the conflict and will back any project that offers hope of national recovery.

Overwhelming endorsement

In the days preceding the referendum, Mr Bouteflika toured all parts of the country, addressing rallies and putting his ideas to the people directly. That has clearly paid off. He can now say that he has what he wanted - an overwhelming public endorsement for his plans for civil concord.

As a by-product, it may also give him the legitimacy and credibility which were cast in doubt by the manner of his election in April when he ended up as the only candidate.

He can now shrug aside the objections of critics on both sides of the national divide and proceed with greater authority to implement a plan which is already in fact under way.

A new civil concord law has been passed by parliament and special centres have been set up where repentant rebels can hand themselves in. A number of Islamic prisoners have already been released.

Many of those who voted for the plan hope it really does mark the beginning of the end. But Algerian political analysts are in general only cautiously optimistic.



Advanced options | Search tips




Back to top | BBC News Home | BBC Homepage | ©




Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East | South Asia



Relevant Stories

17 Sep 99 | Africa
Algeria says yes to peace

16 Sep 99 | Africa
Analysis: A people tired of conflict

26 Aug 99 | Africa
Campaigning starts in Algerian peace referendum

22 Aug 99 | Middle East
Breaking the cycle of violence

05 Jul 99 | Africa
Analysis: Algerian president's peace plan





Internet Links


Algeria Info

World Algeria Action


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.




In this section

Dam builders charged in bribery scandal

Burundi camps 'too dire' to help

Sudan power struggle denied

Animal airlift planned for Congo

Spy allegations bug South Africa

Senate leader's dismissal 'a good omen'

Tatchell calls for rights probe into Mugabe

Zimbabwe constitution: Just a bit of paper?

South African gays take centre stage

Nigeria's ruling party's convention

UN to return to Burundi

Bissau military hold fire

Nile basin agreement on water cooperation

Congo Brazzaville defends peace initiative

African Media Watch

Liberia names new army chief