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Last Updated: Wednesday, 3 March, 2004, 08:50 GMT
Nigerian unions stop bank strike
Petrol traders in Lagos
The NLC has called several strikes over fuel price rises
Nigeria's main labour movement has called off a planned strike by bank employees, after what it called satisfactory talks with employers.

The Nigerian Labour Congress (NLC) said the banks had reversed an earlier decision to ban the employees from joining trade unions.

The strike, which included planned pickets of nearly 40 banks, was due to start on Thursday.

The union said that under the ban the workers were vulnerable to abuses.

What this meeting has done is to convince the banks that they have to have the unions to exist in the various banks
Adams Oshiomhole
NLC president
The NLC has called several strikes over fuel price rises and over the weekend said it was backing an opposition party in this month's local elections.

Its president, Adams Oshiomhole, had said the strike was necessary because many of the country's newer banks were not allowing employees to join unions, thus leaving them without representation and open to abusive practises.

The union had also claimed that female employees were discouraged from marrying and if they did they are sometimes fired.

The decision to call off the strike came as a result of a three-way meeting with the government and management of the banks.

"What this meeting has done is to convince the banks that they have to have the unions to exist in the various banks," Mr Oshiomhole said.


SEE ALSO:
Nigerian unions back opposition
01 Mar 04  |  Africa
Profile: Adams Oshiomhole
07 Jul 03  |  Africa
Nigeria fuel strike ban fails
06 Feb 04  |  Africa
Nigeria tackles fuel subsidies
18 Jul 03  |  Business


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