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Tuesday, 4 February, 2003, 12:19 GMT
Sanctions threat for Somali warlords
Somali delegates
Delegates say they have got used to their new life in Eldoret
An agreement to stop fighting during Somali peace talk has been repeatedly broken, East African mediators say.

Foreign ministers from Kenya, Ethiopia and Djibouti say they are considering imposing sanctions, including expulsion from the talks and a travel ban, on those responsible.

We have a long list of violations beginning soon after the declaration was signed on 27 October

Kalonzo Musyoka, Kenyan Foreign Minister
The truce had been seen as the major achievement of the talks, which have become bogged down in arguments about cutting the number of delegates.

Somalia has not had a central government in 12 years of fighting between rival warlords.

Some 1,000 people initially turned up for the talks in the Kenyan town of Eldoret, although just 300 had been invited.

'Hijacked'

Kenyan Foreign Minister Kalonzo Musyoka said that the talks may be moved to a government-owned training college near the capital, Nairobi, in order to cut costs.

Some Eldoret hotel owners have been complaining that they were not being paid, according to Associated Press news agency.

"We have a long list of violations beginning soon after the declaration was signed on 27 October," Mr Musyoka told a news conference on the sidelines of an African Union summit in Addis Ababa.

"These violations run through November, December and parts of January."

Civil society representatives complain that the warlords have hijacked the peace talks.

Last week, a professor was beaten up after demonstrating in favour of a switch away from Eldoret.

A Transitional National Government was set up in 2000, following long negotiations in Djibouti.

But it only controls parts of the capital, Mogadishu.


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30 Jan 03 | Africa
28 Jan 03 | Africa
14 Jan 03 | Africa
27 Oct 02 | Africa
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