BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 17 December, 2002, 16:11 GMT
The Global Live family
Paul Rozario
Paul Rozario brought his family to the BBC
Shortly after 16:20 GMT on Thursday, seven family members in four different continents will speak to each other and hear other in perfect FM broadcast quality.

It is all part of Global Live which aims to bring people together around the subject of the BBC making the world smaller.

Members of the Rozario family - based in Singapore, Australia, Germany, Bombay and Kenya - will be able to have a conversation on air as if in the same room.

It is all part of the World Service's 70th anniversary celebrations, bringing people together through the BBC.

Hosting the party will be presenter Ben Malor - from the top of Table Mountain in South Africa - and the family catch-up will be heard by millions.

31-year-old Paul Rozario started the dialogue leading to this on-air get together through the new World Service website, www.bbcworldservice.com, and told us about his worldwide family.

Meet the family

Paul's father Antony and his mum Rose left Kerala in Southern India for Singapore in the 1950s.

Antony was a merchant seaman and big fan of World Service.

"He used to get me and my brothers up at 6am to listen," recalls Paul.

Paul will join the programme from Brisbane, Australia, where it will be 3:20 am. Older brother John will be back in Singapore with his parents.

Getting connected

Meanwhile youngest brother Tom, who lives in Germany, has journeyed to London to participate in the conversation from the studio in Bush House, London - home of the World Service.

The men will also have a chance to hook up with their aunt in Bombay and their uncle George, on the end of the line in Nairobi, Kenya.

But the Rozarios will not be the only ones connected on the day.

Global Live, both on air and online, is asking how the world keeps in touch through the BBC.

Listen on Thursday to find out.

arrow
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes